Lumu Blog

Anchor yourself to something special

With each new Kickstarter update we are confronted with the idea to just mount a camera in our offices through which you could monitor our work 24/7, so you could constantly see what we’re up to. Maybe this way we could avoid writing these updates altogether?

Nah, let’s just show you everything we’ve got so far, nobody wants to lose extra time setting up that camera anyways.

So, without further ado, here’s everything new from last month.

Electronics

The development processes in the electronics department have now closed and we are happy to say that the results are more than satisfying. We have already made the first batch of prototypes, which have been tested, marked as successful and now we can move onto the second series. Those are going into assembly with other hardware components so we can conduct other “real-life” tests, how the Lightning connector is behaving under pressure and if each electronic part is properly designed. In other words: to get a feel for it once it is all put together.

The firmware work is in its final stages, constantly tested throughout, mainly to cover and check all the edge cases it will inevitably be confronted with.

The final stage is sensor calibration. We have travelled to Jena, Germany to meet the MAZeT engineering team, to revision our calibration procedure and we can happily announce that our innovative approach has been confirmed as correct. Not only that but we have made set arrangements on how & when to stay in touch throughout our whole calibration procedure so there won’t be any room for error. Needless to say we have used this trip to place our order for all the main electronic components & sensors that usually take most of the time to be delivered.


Lumulabs engineering team visits MAZeT in Jena, Germany

They showed us a bit of behind the scenes of what their production line is capable of

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MAZeT electronic components on display

 

Hardware Assembly

So this is an area where we have moved forward *a lot* but with still a lot of things to be done, checked, tested and re-done once more.

We are now ordering a large quantity of a cable that will connect the electric board to the lightning connector, which we designed ourselves and which will in the end be soldered by hand, by our manufacturing partners, in their laboratory.

The housing, which will be made out of stainless steel, will have the shield (that little bulge through which the Lightning connector will look through) incorporated which means it will be laser welded out of one piece. This welding needs to be tested out and the shield itself too, since it has to apply to Apple’s production standards. And that is the main reason why we are moving to the second batch of our prototypes.

The collimator design has also changed — it’ll be round, since we are going to use CNC milling instead of injection molding. Why? Because this — together with the change of its design — will provide even greater accuracy in final metering. Why is this necessary? Because we are flirting with the idea to apply for the NIST Certificate of Calibration, so everything needs to be pitch perfect.

But all this will follow after the product is shipped, first we have to take care about the stuff that cannot be postponed.

Lastly — we have ordered 5000 Lightning connector units which we expect to arrive slightly before the start of production.

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Testing different collimator hole layouts for optimal laser drilling

iOS App

So we have asked you to join our beta test group a while ago and we still haven’t had the chance to send you an invitation to test the first iteration of our brand new Lumu app. Not very nice of us but had to tweak some minor things in the settings area with our electricians, since new features require new values.

Not a very illustrative explanation — we know — but what you should know is that the app will be pushed to AppStore for review by the end of this week and hopefully they will push it out to you for download within the next 24-48h. :)

Furthermore, Lumu Power firmware implementation is coming up next and thus preparing groundwork for other features that we plan to upgrade in the months following the launch.

Packaging & other paraphernalia

Ideas are shaped & produced into prototypes, packaging solutions are sought from all different industries, so we can play with different ideas on what the end packaging will look like. A trip to a nearby packaging factory is scheduled next week in order to get a feeling of what they are capable of and so that we can then think of new approaches of what is possible. This is still the most creative part of our campaign and one that takes the least amount of our time.


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Conclusion

The fact of the matter is, it’s summertime and most of the folks are taking their prolonged vacations in these months. Not us though — if when, we are taking our days off much, much later (if ever by the looks of it).

And even though work gets done, it inevitably gets done just that tiny bit later than usual.


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In December we promised you your Lumu Power in the beginning of summer (June). Then we were faced with some unforeseeable issues with our main electrician, which we covered pretty fast (and pretty successfully too) so we moved our deadline to August, with the minimum possible delay in our minds. But what we are facing right now is another minimum delay — to end of summer (September).

We are fully aware that we are not pushing the bar just ever so slightly ahead in the future so that we could do it again next month. It’s just that we are now much more acquainted with all the final steps (and its deadlines) that need to be done before the finish line. The closer we approach it, the clearer the picture we get.

Let us know what are your thoughts or if you have any kind of questions regarding what-so-ever. We are here to help you to get the same clear picture we have.

Featured Photographer #51: Chung Hsiao Chen

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you? I think it’s when I had my part time job at college, the workplace was a very beautiful little garden, people came to have a couple of cups of coffee and many photographers liked to do photo shoots there. I was attracted to the magical sound of the camera shutter so I got my first Nikon FM2.

Featured Photographer #51: Chung Hsiao Chen

Featured Photographer #51: Chung Hsiao Chen

Since then I learn how to take photos, I mean techniques and theories. I didn’t really feel photography at that period of time until I started to travel, the world makes me wonder how to pour my feeling into a flat picture, and I am still learning now.


Featured Photographer #51: Chung Hsiao Chen

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand? I won’t let that happen. :) I can not imagine I don’t have my camera in hand when I am travelling, they are like twins, camera and travelling.

Featured Photographer #51: Chung Hsiao Chen

What do you want to achieve? I love to record my friends, especially those who travel with me. People usually see themselves to much, I rather capture faces and emotions around me. Even though I am not in the frame, I can still feel my existence outside the frame through their eyes.


Featured Photographer #51: Chung Hsiao Chen

Featured Photographer #51: Chung Hsiao Chen

What’s in your camera bag? I don’t shoot everyday, I am not a professional photographer, just a person who loves to soak in the light. I have a LOMO camera, a Polaroid SX-70, a Leica M8 and a Nikon FM2. They are all in use, I choose digital mostly, they are instant and cheap, but sometimes I need films to remind me how traditional photography is.


Featured Photographer #51: Chung Hsiao Chen

Featured Photographer #51: Chung Hsiao Chen

Ansel Adams or Annie Lebowitz or Martin Parr or Alec Soth? Alex Webb, David Alan Harvey, Maria Plotnikova and Kawashima Kotori.

Links or anything else you would like to share!

The new Lumu App

“I think the real value concerns the potential for technology to reveal something that was not visible before.”

— Design for Dasein, Thomas Wendt

The New Lumu app is made to be a tool that helps you do your best work. It does not want attention, it does not want to stand in the way. It is not an object of admiration. It doesn’t have a lot of features. It doesn’t need them.

It does, and it should help you do one thing really, really well.

Focus on what matters

When we set off to build a completely new Lumu, we wanted it to replace the chunky old way of doing things. By making the Lumu Power for the iPhone, we replaced a huge device with a tiny one.

But instead of adding a million features, we want you to do that one task you are supposed to do, without the unnecessary hassle.



Made to be used, and abused

The new Lumu app is made to work for all situations with both the Lumu Lite and Lumu Power device. It has different modes for different use cases and an almost limitless path for improving the user’s experience of using the device.

The app and it’s look reflect how we think about the world at large. It’s a robust look with a lot of constraints that enable us as designers to make the best use of the space we have on the screen.



New Lumu app

From left to right: our old Lumu Photo app, the dark iteration in the middle and the final, clean version on the right.



New Lumu app

It became clear that we wouldn’t want to clutter the screen too much with unnecessary baggage. We got rid of it, so you can focus on that one information you actually need, yet access everything else with minimum number of strokes.



New Lumu app

The Notes feature was the most complicated one to build but we had to do it from scratch. We listened a lot to your feedback and we believe we figured it out this time. Nonetheless, you shall be the final judge once we push it live.


The new app supports the Lumu Light Meter as well as Lumu Power with new features that we are expecting to ship every month.

If you’d like to try our beta app you are welcome to send us an email and apply to our early test group: pr@lu.mu

Featured Photographer #50: Johnny Patience

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today? I wanted to become a stuntman when I was really little, then an archaeologist when I was around 10 or 12, followed by working in advertising when I was a teenager and finally a psychologist before I finished school. In a way, being a photographer incorporates aspects of all of these jobs.

Featured Photographer #50: Johnny Patience

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you? Photography started as a creative outlet for me about 8 years ago. I didn’t plan to become a professional photographer but looking back today I wish I would have found and pursued this path earlier in my life. I feel that photography is what I am meant to do.

Featured Photographer #50: Johnny Patience

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand? I almost always have a camera in my hand. My wife Rebecca and I moved to the United States half a year ago and I started a 365 on the day we arrived at our new house. I am shooting daily since then and share my photographs on my blog. I also play guitar and I love reading books, but usually I’m somewhere on the road traveling, exploring and working on a photography project.

Featured Photographer #50: Johnny Patience

Your personal story with photography in 12 words. Be a little less serious about life and a little more serious about art.

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)? If I could pick a superpower it would probably be eating six scoops of ice cream without feeling sick to my stomach afterwards.

My biggest fear for a long time was flying on an airplane - which is a problem if you primarily shoot travel. I overcame that after flying 22 times in one year. Now I enjoy long distance flights.

What attracts you to the work you shoot? My work is about going to the deepest, most vulnerable place in my heart, expressing what I find and sharing it with the world.


Featured Photographer #50: Johnny Patience

Featured Photographer #50: Johnny Patience

The longer I shoot the more I feel that a good photograph is really given to you much more than you are making it. There are so many things that need to align at once for a picture to be good that it’s something I feel is really out of my control.

In your opinion, where is the social barrier between the photographer and the subject? That depends on the subject. Generally I don’t like overly sexual or crass photographs that exploit the subject to create some sort of shock value.

What annoys you the most in this profession? Photographers taking inspiration from other photographers without giving credit.

Featured Photographer #50: Johnny Patience

What’s in your camera bag? I shoot film exclusively and I work with a minimalist approach to gear: one camera, one lens and natural light. I don’t have very much equipment and know exactly how a shot will come out before I take it, how my film stock will render the tones and how my lens will interpret the scene. I love working with these constraints.

My camera bag currently contains the following:

  • Leica M2
    Leica Summicron-M 50mm f/2

  • Leica M-A
    Leica Summicron-M 50mm f/2

  • Hasselblad 501CM
    Carl Zeiss Planar T* 2.8/80

  • Hasselblad 503CW
    Carl Zeiss Planar T* 2.8/80

  • Kodak Portra 400
    Kodak Tri-X 400
  • Lumu light meter

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose? One of my Leicas, one of my Hasselblads, film and my iPhone.


Featured Photographer #50: Johnny Patience

Featured Photographer #50: Johnny Patience

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings? I always try to rely on both.

Pearls of wisdom for fellow photographers to be? Shoot from the heart, not from the hip.

Ansel Adams or Annie Lebowitz or Martin Parr or Alec Soth? I try to avoid looking at too much photography, I don’t find it helpful to take inspiration from people working in the same field. I find a lot of inspiration in other art forms like music, literature, paintings. I think Quentin Tarantino is a genius, for example.


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Featured Photographer #50: Johnny Patience



Links or anything else you would like to share!

NYCWLK 2.0

NYCWLK is a New York City-based informal photo walk and social gathering that is open to all photographers, regardless of experience level, brand affiliation or medium (film, digital or hybrid). It is organized by photographers Johnny Patience and his wife Rebecca Patience.


NYCWLK 2.0


NYCWLK 2.0

The day represents a non-competitive, supportive and fun environment where all are welcome. At 11am there will be a two-hour workshop hosted by Johnny Patience, followed by Coffee & Cameras at 2:30pm and the photowalk from 4:30 to approximately 6:30pm.


NYCWLK 2.0

NYCWLK 2.0

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We will finish the day with socializing, drinks and food at 61 Local at 6:30pm (open end).


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We are privileged to have Richard Photo Lab, Kodak Alaris, Lumu, ONA and KEH sponsoring NYCWLK.

More — www.nycwlk.com

Photo credits:


— Bill McCarroll

— Cody Priebe

— Riley Joseph

— Thomas Skrlj

— Johnny Patience

Pinhole Master

We are proud to introduce you to yet another way how to approach photography with your Lumu — Stephen Best created a new app that probably tackles all the know issues our own Lumu Pinhole app has and adds those functionalities we neglected.


Stephen Best: Pinhole Master app

Read more about it from its AppStore app description below:

“Pinhole Master is a light meter and exposure timer for pinhole photographers, or anybody else photographing with long exposures. It uses your iPhone/iPad camera or a Lumu to determine the light level (Exposure Value) then calculates the exposure required. Maintain a library of cameras you own and films/papers you use, together with optional fully customisable reciprocity failure compensation. The app’s goals are accuracy and efficient real-world use. Pinhole Master has everything you need to easily master pinhole photography!”

And so you should! Please find the links to the app below.

 

Stephen Best: Pinhole Master app

We are also posting some photos Stephen exhibited last year in Canberra, Australia. Here’s what he had to say about it.

“All were taken with a Zero 612F pinhole camera on Fujifilm Neopan Acros 100. Metering was done almost exclusively with an iPhone 4S and a Lumu. The film was scanned with a Flextight 848 and printed (toned) on Hahnemühle Photo Rag Ultra Smooth paper with an Epson Stylus Pro 9900.”


Stephen Best: Pinhole Master app


Stephen Best: Pinhole Master app

Make sure to check his blog post for more of his work:

http://www.stephenbestphotography.com

Featured Photographer #49: Mario Bertieri

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today? I wanted to be a taxi driver. And a bartender. And a mechanic. Pretty much your standard 80′s kid growing up with mom playing Springsteen all day long.


Featured Photographer #49: Mario Bertieri

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you? 3 words: uncle, Nikon, film. I still have the camera should he ask.


Featured Photographer #49: Mario Bertieri

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?
 I manage the darkroom at Cre8 Studio in East London with Camera Work London and teach photography in Vienna. When idle I tend to eat hommos, fail at personal relationships and read books. I recently picked up drawing but I suck at it.


Featured Photographer #49: Mario Bertieri


Your personal story with photography in 12 words:
 I always wanted to drive nails in the maelstrom of time.

What do you want to achieve? Superpowers: I like people and know the medium. Super-weaknesses: I like people and know the medium.


Featured Photographer #49: Mario Bertieri

What attracts you to the work you shoot? The stillness, the unsaid words and the inbetween between said and unsaid.

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from? It comes from doing your homework: study technique, study the work of other photographers, study yourself, learn to shut up and listen.


Featured Photographer #49: Mario Bertieri

Featured Photographer #49: Mario Bertieri

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble? Crazy is really subjective. And I am boring. In trouble? Yes. I spent a whole day at the police station because I had some exposed rolls of 35mm and ended in a drug razzia and didn’t want the police to open them.

In your opinion, where is the social barrier between the photographer and the subject? Barrier has a very negative connotation. Photography is the documentation of my interaction with the subject. The barrier is flexible, and most of the times very very durchlässig.


Featured Photographer #49: Mario Bertieri

What annoys you the most in this profession? The usual: lack of budget, tight schedules, and hipsteria.

What’s in your camera bag? Light meter. Films. Cigarettes. Money for coffee. And other things which I cannot write because my parents will read this interview.

How it affects your process, how often do you / don’t you shoot? Working mostly with analog material / large format. I tend to be quite slow and methodical.

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose? My Mamiya RZ. A shitload of films. A light meter. A clamp.


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Featured Photographer #49: Mario Bertieri

 

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings? Set up. Check everything. Be sure the tech stuff won’t bother you. Then do the feelings part.

Pearls of wisdom for fellow photographers to be? Stop wanking about technique. Go to an exhibition together.

Ansel Adams or Annie Lebowitz or Martin Parr or Alec Soth? Ansel bores me, Annie sold her soul, Martin is too british-humored and Alec I don’t like. What about mr. Bailey or mr. Avedon?


You can find Mario on Instagram or reach out to him on his website.

Featured Photographer #48: Caroline Sauvage



Hi! My name is Caroline Sauvage. I’m 28 years old and I live in France.



Featured Photographer #48: Caroline Sauvage

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today? When I was a child I wanted to become an illustrator, but also a guitarist in a rock band, a stylist, and of course a veterinary. I always liked creating things and try new mediums of creation. Unfortunately I don’t save animal’s lives today but I found the artirstic way that suits me as a photolover, and I’m loving it.



Featured Photographer #48: Caroline Sauvage


Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you? I grew up in a family that took a loooot of pictures. My parents always had a camera in their bag to capture our family memories & I enjoyed watching our family photo albums. When I was approximately 7 years old, at the beginning of summer, my parents bought me a disposable camera so I can capture my own memories. I liked it so much that they bought me one every summer and that’s how I fell in love with photography.



Featured Photographer #48: Caroline Sauvage

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand? I currently spend my days glued to a computer, as a graphic designer in a freelance team with Marion, my lover. We are working at home in Lyon, a beautiful city near the Alps in France. When we have time to spare, we love hiking in the mountains, hiting the road on our british motorcycle and riding our longboard & rollerblades every Saturday afternoon.

Your personal story with photography in 12 words. Stop looking. Start seeing. Photograph what you love.



Featured Photographer #48: Caroline Sauvage

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)? I think my main weekness is my lack of self-confidence. I often doubt about myself and the quality of my work. I’m feeling it in my everyday work but also in my personnal photographs, I always think it could be better & need to be reassured. Luckily I have the best lover who is always ready to help & encourage me, and if I’m not enough satisfed, I don’t hesitate to do it again.



Featured Photographer #48: Caroline Sauvage

What attracts you to the work you shoot? My inspiration simply comes from my everyday life. I’m always fascinated by the colors, the light & the nature around me. I love photographing the simple things of life that make me happy: like a hike in the mountains, a good homemade meal, a new tattoo under my skin, the first spring flowers, a colorful sunset… When I see or do something I love, I’m capturing it and I’m trying to make it as beautiful as I see it.



Featured Photographer #48: Caroline Sauvage

What’s in your camera bag? In my everyday life, I always have a SLR camera in my bag, like a Canon AE-1 Program, an Olympus OM10 or a Canonet QL17 GIII.

When I go hiking or travel, I like to take 3 types of film camera : a SLR camera, a Medium-format camera (like my Hasseblad 501CM or my Pentacon Six TL) and an Instant camera (like my Polaroïd Land 250 or my Instax Mini). This allows me to diversify my shots and to have more fun. On top on that I also have an additional lens, like a 28mm f/2.8, to complete the 50mm connected to my SLR camera. This is the ideal lens for landscapes, it allows me to capture larger views.


Featured Photographer #48: Caroline Sauvage

To conclude, I never go out to take photographs without my Lumu light meter, it really helps me to make te perfect settings when the light conditions are complicated.



Featured Photographer #48: Caroline Sauvage

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe for a year, what would you choose? If it rained Kodak films in this parallel universe, I’ll take without hesitation my Canon AE-1 Program, my 28mm f/2.8 lens, my Hasselblad 501CM & my Lumu light meter. These are my favorite cameras and the ones I use most of the time. I’m never disappointed with these two and I think I really love them because they were my first SLR & medium-format cameras.



Featured Photographer #48: Caroline Sauvage

Links or anything else you would like to share!

You can follow my work on:

Flickr
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

Featured Photographer #47: Valentin Zelger



I want to apologize in advance because I’m not a very good writer and writing this was really hard for me. I’m more of a visual guy than a poet. But I’m really more than happy to get featured, so let’s begin.



Featured Photographer #47: Valentin Zelger

My name is Valentin Zelger, I’m 25 years old and I live in Vienna, Austria. I study Photography at the Graphische in Vienna since 2015. Before that I went to Film school and worked on film sets in the light & camera department.



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Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you? I always loved taking pictures and videos and used whatever I could find to do that. As a child I always wanted to become a director but then I found out that the director isn’t the guy behind the camera, so after that the dream was being a cameraman.



Featured Photographer #47: Valentin Zelger

For a long time I never thought about doing photography as well, the idea came to me when I was on vacation on Bali. I was tired of having to carry around my heavy DSLR on vacation so I just took two small point & shoots with me and some rolls of film. When the pictures were developed, I immediately fell in love with the look of them.


Featured Photographer #47: Valentin Zelger

That was the moment when I fell in love with film photography and the whole analog process.



Featured Photographer #47: Valentin Zelger

What attracts you to the work you shoot? I don’t really specialize in any kind of photography. When I want to do architecture then I do architecture, when I feel like portrait, I do portrait.


Featured Photographer #47: Valentin Zelger

With my photography I want people to show how I see the world and maybe give the viewer a little push to look a bit closer on the seemingly ordinary things in life. Because often these are the most beautiful things.



Featured Photographer #47: Valentin Zelger

What’s in your camera bag? I always carry more than one camera in my bag but it really depends on what I want to do. Most of the time I carry my Leica M6 and my Sony A7II with me. I use the same lenses for both cameras and I also really love my Hasselblad with which I use the Lumu the most.


Featured Photographer #47: Valentin Zelger

It just feels good to fire the shutter of this big, heavy, beautiful camera and then having these really great negatives. But I also shoot a lot with cheap point & shoot cameras because you can always have them with you in your jacket or backpack.



Featured Photographer #47: Valentin Zelger

If you could give one final advice to your fellow photographers, what would it be? Think before you push the shutter and don’t rely on the post processing.

Top 4 current photographers? Gregory Crewdson, Adreas Gusrky, Matthias Heiderich, Glashier


Instagram: @zerlegerv


For more Valentin’s photos check our Flickr group: LINK.

Featured Photographer #46: Andrew Hutchinson



My name is Andrew Hutchinson, from Phoenix Arizona, where the heat comes from, and I have been photographing things my entire life. But I became more serious about it in the last five years.



Featured Photographer #46: Andrew Hutchinson

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you? I met photography when I was born. My great uncle was a professional photographer most of his adult life, and growing up cameras were all around, and we were always taking pictures. It always shocked me when I went to my friend houses and they didn’t have 6 cameras and rolls of 35 and 120mm film, 20-30 albums full of family photos and 15 reels of Kodak 8mm film of home movies… I thought everyone’s house had those.

Featured Photographer #46: Andrew Hutchinson

That’s when I began to figure out that something was slightly different about my family, and myself, in relation to cameras and photography.


What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand? When I don’t have a camera in my hand, or rather when I need to pay the bills, I am a production manager and lighting designer for a large production company in Scottsdale Arizona, and I am always being inspired by the people I work with and the shows we design. I do love my job, one of the perks being that I get to travel on someone else’s dime to interesting places, and I get to photograph them!



Featured Photographer #46: Andrew Hutchinson

Your personal story with photography in 12 words. I was trying to write my story with photography in 12 words, but it didn’t fit. Basically photography saved my life 5 years ago. I had reached a personal and professional crisis and had a moment of clarity that I needed to get my head together. That’s when I picked up a camera again. Looking through the viewfinder and concentrating on the act of making a photograph allowed me to put the rest of my life in perspective, and get my head screwed on straight. Well, as straight as it is ever going to be.



Featured Photographer #46: Andrew Hutchinson

What do you want to achieve? As much as I love photography, I am still trying to learn to remember the little things, like check my settings before I shoot, remember to meter, with my Lumu of course, (see what I did there, a little product placement) and to check ALL four corners of my frame BEFORE I hit the shutter. As much as I love digital cameras, they have taught me some bad habits over the years, and it takes discipline to remember to double check everything when I am shooting film.

I was thinking about the work I shoot, and really, what captures my attention are very small moments. Light hitting a leaf just right, a perfect balance of sun, sky, and light, that makes the scene in front of you look like a storybook, small details in an ordinary object that turn it into something extraordinary. I like to celebrate and document the small moments and details in life that pass you by if you’re not looking.



Featured Photographer #46: Andrew Hutchinson

I don’t know what makes a “good” photographer, but as far was any wisdom, I always think of something a design professor said in a college lighting design class: “You’re not lighting the set or the actor, you’re lighting the space around the set and the actor, do that well and the scene will always be well lit.” For me at least, I am not taking a picture of a subject, I am taking a picture of the space around the subject. If I get that right, the subject will look great.

Have you ever got yourself in trouble? I haven’t done anything too crazy as a photographer, the only time I got in trouble was at a cemetery once. The groundskeeper said I needed to delete my images and I had a film camera with me. He got very confused when I said couldn’t delete the images, and I wasn’t going to pull out my roll of film as I had some family pictures on it that I wasn’t going to sacrifice. Police were called. But, since they did not have a “no photography” sign posted, and it was a public cemetery, I got to keep the film in the camera.



Featured Photographer #46: Andrew Hutchinson

What annoys you the most in this profession? I think overall the thing that annoys me the most about photography, or photographers, is the constant technical talk about photography. I want to talk about composition and mood and art!!! Not what F stop you used. If I really want to know something specific and technical, I’ll ask, but I hate when you tell another photographer: “Great image!” — and I get a 5 minute breakdown on the technical specifications of how they shot it. (It’s not just photography by the way, many lighting designers do the same thing, and it’s JUST as annoying.)



Featured Photographer #46: Andrew Hutchinson

What’s in your camera bag? As far as what is in my camera bag, it changes quite a bit depending on what I’m shooting or where I am traveling, but some things are constant. Right now I have the following: Sony A6000 (always have) and a Lensbaby Velvet 56 lens (I LOVE this lens), my Lumu (1st gen), and my iPhone 6+, an Ondu pinhole (35mm 1st gen), a Canon EOS Rebel 2000 (always have) and a Horizon Kompakt.

This can vary, for example, my Holga pinhole will usually come along for a mural shoot, it’s easier to use than the Ondu as far as film is concerned (however, as soon as my new 120 mm Ondu’s arrive that will more than likely change). I will also swap out the Kompakt for my Zenit ET, or a FED 5 (in case you can’t tell, I really like Russian optics, and cameras, really bulletproof) and sometimes my Polaroid 440 land will come along too. And I always have my Mamiya C33.



Featured Photographer #46: Andrew Hutchinson

How does it affect your process, how often do you shoot? As far as how my gear affects my shooting, it really doesn’t. I shoot every day, at least one image, if not more, I always have my phone, and it is probably the most used piece of gear I have, if for no other reason than it is always with me. And if I could only take four pieces of gear into oath universe it would be 1.) My Mamiya C33,  2.) Lumu, 3.) Ondu 6x12 pinhole, 4.) Sony A6000 (I am assuming they can process and scan film in this universe).

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings? I find I have a tendency to shoot first and meter later, it’s a bad habit, but I will almost always rely on my feelings more than the gear, I just use the “Sunny 16″ and go. That said, if it is a really important shot, I will meter first, and I always meter my pinhole shots.



Featured Photographer #46: Andrew Hutchinson

Pearls of wisdom for fellow photographers to be? As far as wisdom, I would say refer to my answer to a good photographer, and have FUN!, this isn’t rocket science, and we aren’t saving lives, we are just making art, and art should be fun!

Ansel Adams or Annie Lebowitz or Martin Parr or Alec Soth? My list of  current favorite photographers might seem a bit odd, but here it goes:

Fritz Arno Wagner — I know he is a cinematographer but his use of light was amazing, and whenever I am working in black & white, I am always thinking of his films.

Tabitha Soren — I started watching her on MTV and followed her into photography. I love her work.

Dorothea Lange — Her images of the Depression and American life at that time are some of the most visually arresting I have ever seen.

Robert Capa — Some of the most affecting images of conflict I have ever seen.

Links or anything else you would like to share!

Website — http://lightingbug512.wix.com/lbcreative

Twitter — https://twitter.com/lightingbug1

Ello — https://ello.co/lightingbug1

Featured Photographer #45: Jérémie Mazenq



My name is Jérémie, I am 32, I live in Bordeaux in the south west of France, I am a photographer & a sound engineer.



Featured Photographer #45: Jérémie Mazenq

My parents made a lot of pictures in my childhood and my father had a laboratory at home so I quickly made my first pictures.

Then I turned to the music & sound and I became a sound engineer for film.

In my job, I was brought to meet many directors of photography so I had the desire to return back to photography. I was 25 then.



Featured Photographer #45: Jérémie Mazenq


I also love to travel, listen to and play music & movies but I always have a camera with me.

Your personal story with photography in 12 words. Photography is for me a way to express myself and to show how I see life.



Featured Photographer #45: Jérémie Mazenq

What do you want to achieve? I don’t want to achieve anything in particular, I just love making pictures, meeting new people.



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Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from? The definition of a good photographer is probably different depending on people, for me it is just to make images with honesty and simplicity.



Featured Photographer #45: Jérémie Mazenq

What annoys you the most in this profession? What annoys you most about this job is the lack of consideration of some customers. Under the pretext that we practice a profession that is also a passion, they allow them to make indecent proposals. The lack of humility is also a big problem in our profession.



Featured Photographer #45: Jérémie Mazenq

What’s in your camera bag? I have often several cameras with me. For my personal photos I only use film cameras. I like to have several formats:



Featured Photographer #45: Jérémie Mazenq

In 135mm I use a Leica M6 with a 50mm and a Canon F1 with a 28mm.

In 120mm my favorite is a Rolleiflex 3.5F and I have also a Mamiya 7II with a 80mm.

In my studio I use my 4x5 Graflex speed graphic which i love very, very much! I also like instant photography with my beautiful SX-70.

I process color and black & white by myself and I do my own prints by traditional process.

For commissioned work, I use a Canon 5d mark III.



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If you could give one final advice to your fellow photographers, what would it be? Anyone can learn the technique. Be yourself and show your differences.



Featured Photographer #45: Jérémie Mazenq

Your top 4 current photographers? Annie Leibovitz, Peter Lindbergh, Sally Mann, Helmut Newton, David Hamilton, etc.



Featured Photographer #45: Jérémie Mazenq

Links or anything else you would like to share!

Website : http://jeremiemazenq.com

Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/jeremiemazenq/

Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/jmazenq/

Featured Photographer #44: Kilian Idsinga



Well, first of all I want to thank you for this opportunity. It means the world to me! My name is Kilian and I’m a Dutch graphic & editorial designer and I launched my own magazine (Let’s Explore Magazine) online over two years ago and in print last December.


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Being creative has always been an important part in my life. My mother was an artist and both my parents let me experiment and experience as much as possible. Expressing myself through music or art was always a possibility as musical instruments, records, papers, pencils, etc. were available in an abundance. This also led me to dream about becoming a musician, playing jazz guitar and / or piano. In the end I played classical piano for a while and played guitar in a jazz big band for little over two years.




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Besides that, visual arts, in one form or another, were never far away. I dreamed about being an architect right after been given a book about Hundertwasser. When I realized a career in music was not an option for me, there was an arts teacher in high school, who pointed out there was such a thing as an art school program for people to participate in on Saturdays, for the duration of one year. I applied to the course, got in and from that moment on that was the only thing I wanted to do. Go to art school, express myself visually and make sure I got through that year, so that after high school I could start the full time education.



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This is also where I came into contact with (proper) photography. Before that, I shot with disposable cameras during holidays and was given a point & shoot camera at some point. But to be honest, I had no idea what I was doing. During that one year course I learned more about composition, juxtaposition, balancing a frame and so on. It very much kickstarted my notion of visual communication. Over the years I’ve been back and forth with photography as my attention was drawn more towards graphic design. Later on I found a way to do both and in the past years I’ve been investing more and more in feeling comfortable with the camera again.

Your personal story with photography in 12 words: Capturing the moment, to document, wherever I go, often with a designer’s “eye”.



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What do you want to achieve? Achievement is a tricky concept. It can lure you into doing things that don’t feel right, just because it brings you closer to a certain goal. At the same time it can provide guidance and structure, so that you’re not running around like a headless chicken.

Not being educated as a photographer, I’m always looking to learn. How do my cameras work technically, what happens when I change a variable and why does something happen. I would say, this is in a way a strength. Being patient in my learning curve, although I’m not a very patient person by nature. Weird, I know.

Something that helps me a lot while out shooting is my background as a graphic designer. I’m very openminded to visual guidance and can find structural lines and patterns quite easily. Often I see those before the captured scene unfolds. I like finding these graphic design elements in my photo’s, even though they sometimes happen subconsciously.

For me, capturing a still moment is the result of seeing, instead of just watching. There’s so much going on around us, it’s actually pretty overwhelming. Finding structure and balance within these is a visual overdose, capturing what matters most is art! This, in my opinion, is applicable in any form of visual communication. But especially in photography, its results can be magnificent when applied well, because it depicts what anybody can see, but doesn’t necessarily see it.

As for my weakness … I don’t shoot enough. There are many excuses why this is happening, some of them valid, but it’s an excuse and can therefore be changed. I always have cameras on me even though I might not use them. But it’s there and it helps me to get comfortable with the idea. Even having them on me changed the way I look at my surroundings. I only have to shoot more now … and that’s the next step!

Have you ever got yourself in trouble? I’m not somebody who takes a lot of risks, unless they’re very calculated. Therefor I never really got into trouble. I don’t see a benefit in getting hurt, just to get the shot. In my subject matter that is. Photographers who report on press related issues, that’s a different ballgame. If I can’t get the shot I want, I’m gutted, don’t get me wrong. But I was still there, in that moment and that matters most. I might have alternative shots that can bring back memories and will trigger that missed shot. To me, that’s more valuable than getting the shot with a good chance of getting hurt, losing something or worse. Life’s way too short to take these kind of risks, that much I have learned out of life so far.



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A social barrier between the photographer and the subject? There is none! We are all human and we tend to forget that we can communicate with each other. Even if we don’t speak each other’s verbal language, there’s body language. Pointing to your camera to ask for a picture, a simple nod or smile to thank somebody. Kindness can bring you and your work to wonderful high’s and less low’s.

This, in a way, annoys me a lot within the photography community. People who think they’re better than others, for whatever reason. Or the fact that some cameras are superior than others. Maybe they are, but there’s still one component that means so much more: the photographer! Without him or her, there will be no image at all. The same goes for the film vs digital discussion. They both have definite pro’s and con’s. This shouldn’t get in the way of hunting down “the shot”.



Featured Photographer #44: Kilian Idsinga

What’s in your camera bag? That’s something that has been growing quickly lately. Up until the beginning of 2015, that was my Canon 60D, accompanied by my Canon 24-105mm 4.0L workhorse, a Canon 17-40 4.0L and a Canon 50mm 1.8. Just recently I added a Canon 40mm 28 pancake to that. This is the kit I’ve been working with and the 24-105 and 50mm were always on me.

Last year, I rediscovered film photography and started using my dad’s Canon AE1, with its 50mm 1.8. I fell in love immediately and started shooting film more and changed the contents of my daily bag: 60D + 24-105mm and AE1 with 50mm. A few months ago I bought the Canon A1 with a set of lenses, but the glass I ended up using was a present from my girlfriend: 35mm 2.8. At the moment, I only carry the AE1 and the A1 … you think there’s a pattern?

In terms of affecting my process, I’m jumping on the bandwagon here: it slowed me down quite a bit. Each shot just had to be “perfect” (the impossible quest) so it took me longer to actually pressing the shutter. Now, I’m picking up speed again. Feeling more comfortable with not seeing instant results. But more importantly, shooting more and more often in one go, increases my learning curve. Trusting my abilities regarding composition and framing moments is a very important aspect though. Needless to say, I’m still learning and having a blast doing so. Also, carrying my gear with at all times is changing the way I’m looking at my surroundings. Not needing to shoot every single scene, but analyzing it and training myself to change settings on my camera and in my mind.



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If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose? These types of questions are impossible to answer and I love them for it. For now, I would say a digital setup (Canon 6D [my next upgrade?] 24-105mm f4L), analogue setup (Canon A1, with my 35mm 2.4), notebook and pen (because sometimes, writing down what’s going on, tells more than the snapshot of an image) and of course a bag full of film (Portra 400 and triX are my way to go at the moment).



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When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings? I very much trust my gut when I’m out shooting. Which is funny, because I am usual somebody who needs confirmation before doing something. But, lately, to fully understand what it is that I am actually doing, I am using instruments more often. I’m using the Lumu light meter, the internal camera meter, sunny 16 and my gut to see how they compare and to learn how I can work any scene. It’s an ongoing process and I very much like how my images are turning out right now. It’s also about learning how to use my gear. I want to reach a point where I don’t have to think as much about settings, before I shoot. It should become second nature and I have to say, my learning curve is steep.



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As for human interaction and trusting myself in how to behave in any given situation, it’s all feeling and common sense. If I want to shoot something (people, street scenes, landscapes), I always make sure there is no way I can get into trouble … most of the time that is. Of course I take the chance here and there but never in a way that I can regret doing it later down the road. Did I miss any shots because of that? Perhaps, but the fact that I can’t remember any of them probably says enough.



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One final advice to your fellow photographers? Just go out and shoot, experiment, don’t hold grudges towards people who have different opinions, push limits and boundaries, make mistakes and learn from them, be kind and treat yourself and the scenes you shoot with the respect they deserve.


Links or anything else you would like to share!


www.letsexploremagazine.com
www.twitter.com/letsexploremag
www.instagram.com/letsexploremag
www.facebook.com/letsexploremagazine