Lumu Blog

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner
 

My name is Steven Miner. Im photographer currently working in Grand Rapids, Michigan. I will be graduating with my BFA in photography this spring. Originally I am from metro Detroit.

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

When I was child It felt like I wanted to do something different with my life every week. I picked up lots of hobbies, got into trouble and took all my toys apart. It wasn't untilI my senior year of high school that I picked up a camera and for some reason it just stuck.

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?

I like to play music and look at things that other artists are doing.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

What do you want to achieve?

At this point I honestly don't know. I know I want to keep making pictures, producing art and having conversations about it. Like most things I think after a while it will all just make sense.

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

It was just one of those hobbies that I decided to pick up. I found my moms camera one day and starting making pictures of my self and things around my house. My senior year I took a photography class and I was sold. I moved to Chicago for school that fall to study at Columbia College where I met the people that most heavily influenced the way I think about photography today.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)?

Superpower? geez I don't know. I always tend to be very precise and exact but I wouldn’t consider that a superpower. My weakness is probably my unparalleled ability to get distracted. Its something I've had to deal with my entire life. Half of the time it gets me into trouble but the other half of the time is when something magical happens. I guess I deal with it just by trusting my self. Knowing that something good could come out of it.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

I think good photographs happen when someone is being honest behind a camera. Not trying to adapt to trends or being mimetic of all the great images that have passed us. Its something that took me a while to start achieving and I am just now starting to see results. I approach photography very intuitively. Sometimes that makes it easy and sometimes it feels like I have forgotten how to make images.

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble?

I've always had pretty good luck. I've never been arrested or told to leave and I'm thankful for that. I usually end up making a better picture knowing I'm somewhere I probably shouldn't be.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

It defiantly is always changing. Right now I probably make under a thousand images a year for personal use.

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose?

Contax T2, Mamiya 7, Some kind of light weight rail camera. And I guess something digital. Maybe a phase one.

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings?

I think I mostly rely on the feeling I have being behind a camera and then making a print. I usually know immediately if I have made anything worth while and thats defiantly a feeling.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

If you could give one final advice / task / riddle to your fellow photographers, what would it be?

Stop thinking about photographs as truth and start considering it as a medium that can convince someone something is true. Things have changed allot since I made that realization.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

Your top 4 current photographers?

Jan Dibbets
John Houck
John Opera
Wolfgang Tillmans

Links or anything else you would like to share!

stevenjohnminer.com

Featured Photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Featured Photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Hi, I'm Rob and I currently reside in Dallas, TX. I work in the film industry as an editor and fell in love with still photography about 3 years ago. I shoot a mixture of film and digital for mostly street and travel, but when I do shoot film I've come to rely on my Lumu to make sure I've got the right settings locked in.

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

At one point I wanted to be an astronaut, then an archaeologist and finally a paleontologist. After seeing Jurassic Park in 1993, I decided that I had to find out how they created those dinosaurs. So at 13 years old I knew the path I wanted to take, and today I work in the film and visual effects industry. So that actually kind of worked out!

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?

When I don't have a camera in my hand, I'm working as an editor - usually editing 24 frames per second instead of just one frame.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

What do you want to achieve?

Photographically speaking, I've really started to focus on more long term projects and less on unrelated snapshots. I'm hoping to be able to pull together some of these images into a full fledged documentary project, with the ultimate goal either being a published book or some kind of exhibition. These are lofty goals as I'm still finding my own style and have a relatively young photography "career", but I think it's important to aim high when it comes to goals like these.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

Given my current career, it will probably come as no surprise that I initially got into photography gear because of its ability to produce amazing video. I initially thought I was going to produce more videos (something I've only just now gotten into with a new YouTube channel), but it was actually the still photography aspects that really grabbed hold of me.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler


In the early days of learning this new equipment, I found myself hitting the shutter button more than the "video record" button, and learning about how to properly compose and expose still images overtook videography entirely.

Film photography actually just landed on me last year! And I fell hard. I currently shoot medium format and 35mm film. I somehow missed the train in my younger years as far as film cameras go and adopted the earliest of digital cameras. It's great to be able to have this equipment now and learn about the nuances of film photography and how different it can be to shooting digital. I can also relate more to the film to digital transition in our motion picture film industry now that I've handled both systems in still photography.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)?

I think a superpower of mine, that a lot of people have noticed and commented on, is how outgoing I am when I'm out shooting. I usually won't hesitate to approach someone if I notice something that entices me to shoot, and I can count on one hand the times people have said "No". You always have to read the scene to know if you should approach someone with enthusiasm or a little more discreet so as not to embarrass them, but usually if you get past the initial introduction with a smile you can put most people at ease and come away with a nice portrait.

As far as weaknesses, like most photographers I can succumb to Gear Acquisition Syndrome, but I've done reasonably well recently in keeping that in check!

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

That's a really great question, and I think the answer is kind of hidden within it. Once you've put yourself in the right place at the right time, it really comes down to truly seeing the scene unfold around you. I think if something catches your eye, that's your instinct telling you that if you take your time and work the scene just right, a good photograph could come from it.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble?

When I lived in Montreal I attended a number of protests (some small, some large). On more than one occasion I found myself in the middle of the protesters and the riot police, and more than once I was tapped on the shoulder to step back or move out of the way. I never found myself in any truly violent situations, but let's just say things got…tense.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

You know how some people say to shoot every day? Well...heh. I don't manage that! I've been spending a lot more time "getting my photographic house in order", so to speak. Backing up digital files, organizing, labeling negatives, properly storing them and printing and framing more of my favorite work. I felt like this foundation was cracking, and lately I've taken to repairing it to make sure that projects I work on from here on out will be properly looked after instead of adding them to a big mess!

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose?

Tough question. Well if it's for an entire year I definitely want to bring a digital solution, so I'd have my Fuji X-T2 with the 18-55mm lens (sorry prime lovers, gotta stay versatile!) and plenty of memory cards and batteries. After that I think I'd bring my Mamiya 645 Pro TL with the 80mm f/2.8. And as much Portra 400 as I can fit in my bag. And of course my Lumu light meter for the film!

Wait, I've gone way over 4 pieces, haven't I? I don't tend to pack light in reality, either...

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings?

I find that this depends on which medium I'm shooting. If I'm shooting digital I rely a lot on the instruments. Electronic viewfinderrs can show us exactly what our exposure will look like, so I can tweak a lot in-camera.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler


When I shoot film, I usually take a reading with my Lumu and then from there, as long as lighting doesn't drastically change, I feel like I'm spending more time on framing, timing and composing (feeling the scene) rather than tweaking camera settings.

If you could give one final advice / task / riddle to your fellow photographers, what would it be?

I once asked a photographer named George Zimbel for advice. His reply was "Advice is bad." Whether or not that's necessarily true, I think an important thing to take away from that is that in any creative medium you have to find your own way. So my "advice" is to take everything with a grain of salt and to not be afraid to share your own unique point of view with the world. Especially in print!

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Your top 4 current photographers?

Top 4? Man, that's incredibly hard. OK, let me try to narrow this down to contemporary photographers who have helped shape my own view of photography and who I actively follow on Twitter. All of them also have unique styles of photography that I enjoy seeing on a daily basis:

Patrick LaRoque (@laroquephoto) - Patrick has this great ability to bring the viewer into the most intimate of moments, almost as if he has a way of finding the beauty in what others would consider mundane situations. He has a keen eye, a great sense of timing and color relationships and also an uncanny ability to work a scene. He also happens to be a wordsmith; perfectly blending his imagery with his heartfelt words.
Johnny Patience (@JohnnyPatience) - Johnny recently completed a 365 project (one photo per day for a year) that I think perfectly reflects his trained eye for composition. I also appreciate Johnny's ability to promote community in the photographic circles I follow, which I think is important in this social media day and age. He actively contributes to the film community by offering his advice and sharing his experiences, and that's a wonderful trait to have.
Joe Greer (@ioegreer) - I only just started following Joe but some of his candid documentary-style shots from the recent US inauguration and subsequent marches really struck a chord with me. His other landscape, travel and lifestyle images from the Pacific Northwest are also stunning.
Andre Wagner (@photoDre) - Andre's style is classic and timeless. His street photography in and around the boroughs of NYC is destined to be looked back on fondly in books and exhibitions. It isn't every day when I can look at a contemporary photographers work and know that it's going to be timeless, you know? It's like I can already hear people when they look back on Andre's work and study his methods and his style. It's great to be able to follow along with him now.

Links or anything else you would like to share!

I just want to say that it's great to be featured on the blog and I'm glad to have my Lumu light meter with me wherever I go!
If anyone reading this wants to get in touch, here's a few ways to interact with me:

Website: www.robzeiglerphoto.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/RobZeigler
Instagram: www.instagram.com/robzeigler

And also, I've finally launched a brand new YouTube channel where I'm going to be sharing reviews and other insights into photography:

www.youtube.com/channel/UCzBC2lX5IPd_iHL2oulR8ag

Thanks again, Lumu!

Featured photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

Featured photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

Hello! My name is Stephan and I live and work with my family in Switzerland. I'm doing pastoral work in a parish and a prison. Photography is a passion which accompanies me since many years and is part of my everyday life.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

In my childhood I wanted to be an explorer of unknown territories. Reading books about ancient times, studying maps of the world...
Well, working with people, especially with inmates in a prison can lead one definitely unto unknown ground…

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?

I love to write and journal a lot, sometimes I do watercolors and love to spend time in the woods. Drawing and describing a location is a different thing than taking pictures, but leads also to an intimate knowledge of a spot. Also reading novels and especially poetry brings me to an new view of the world and the people around me.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

What do you want to achieve?

More and more I try to make pictures which are telling little stories or are evoking personal feelings. I try to reduce scenes and find the one single spot where this can happen.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

I still remember my father with his Zeiss Contaflex and some macro lenses. He loved it to do close-ups of flowers and took also a lot of pictues. My first real camera was a Minolta x500. I always was a visual guy, loving colors and light in different shades. Later I worked with 35mm, medium format and large format and started to look more and more to photobooks to learn more about the art.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)?

Hm. I think I can very well accomodate to different locations, situations and get easily in contact with people. I cannot deny a little gear acquisition syndrom, but Imworking on it…

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

I think it comes out of curiosity and an open mindset. Beeing sensitive for situations, the light and colors, structures and so on.

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble?

Maybe it was not that appropriate to take pictures with a flash in a completely dark hut of a nomad tribe in Ethiopia while a coffeeceremony...

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

Almost daily, I think. To start the day will a little still life on my desk became almost a ritual in the morning. I try to keep an camera with me as often as possible, there are so many interesting situations around, even in the familiar surroundings.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose?

My Leica MP with rolls of film, a fine notebook and fountain pen, a small but powerful lightmeter (any suggestions?), and my old African enamel mug for coffee.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings?

My main focus is on feelings and telling little stories, so I rely more on my feelings than on an instrument. For still lives I try to arrange the items in an eyepleasing, somehow open and natural way. But I need a tool that fits my needs. But I do not like when technic gets between me and my photograph.

If you could give one final advice / task / riddle to your fellow photographers, what would it be?

I'm better off taking advice than giving...

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

Your top 4 current photographers?

Sam Abell - His patience and compositions are amazing.
David Allen Harvey - vivid an colorful.
Raymond Depardon - into the great wide open...
Lorenzo Castatore - his "Paradiso" is a completly different view on life.
Let me mention also Eugene Smith for his dedication to the art and craft.

Thank you to the LUMU Team for giving me the opportunity to share my thoughts and photographs and for your versatile little lightmeter. And thank you, dear reader, for reading this. If you are interested in my pictures, take a look at my Instagram @stephanmbrunner

Featured photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

Featured photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

My name is Omid Kianersi and I live in a Los Angeles suburb. I’m trying my best to get better at photography. I’ve already landed my dream job (okay second dream job after astronaut rockstar) so I get to keep this my passion and creative outlet. I’m pretty proud of the fact that I’ve had a beer on every continent except Antarctica.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

I grew up a curious child in what seemed like a bigger world than what exists today. I wanted to know everything and explore everywhere. As I grew up I intentionally went to a university far from my home and as an adult I’ve made it my goal to travel the world. The curiosity and wonder that child once had still exists in the adult I’ve become only now I have the means and drive to explore them.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?

When I don’t have a camera I’m constantly thinking about light. I’m evaluating the light around me and what techniques I would use to capture what I’m seeing. Like an athlete who repetitively works on a skill so that on game day it comes naturally. I don’t want my camera to limit my ability to capture the decisive moment when it arises.

What do you want to achieve?

My goals is to create work that is meaningful to others. The highest validation I receive is when my work finds its way onto someone’s wall. Whether it be in a gallery or in someone’s bedroom, another person had to find value in my work. From time to time all photographers yearn for mass recognition and adoration. I’m no exception. Yet I always come back to a fundamental desire to create work worthy of display.

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

From the first time I placed an exposed sheet of photo paper into a developer tray in my high school photography class I was hooked. As I agitated the tray an image emerged from a previously white canvas. It was magic.

It still is magic. We all have unique perspectives born from different experiences. I love that photography provides a means for someone to literally see the world as you do even if it is only one image at a time.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)?

I’m not very good at candid street photography and I’m terrible at approaching strangers to take their portraits. That’s probably the reason so much of my work features landscapes or uses people in accessory roles and not as the focal point. My only superpower is a hyper vigilance. Its a benefit to my photography to be aware of my surroundings all the time but it can be a curse in day to day life that I can’t ignore some of the annoying things people around me are doing. It probably explains the early onset curmudgeon-ness I deal with sometimes.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

An often forgotten fact is that the camera is a tool. Photographers sometimes fetishize their gear and I don’t understand that. I love my cameras, my Lumu, my gear. But they are merely a means to producing a print. A photographer should master their equipment and turn their attention to recognizing moment, developing a style, and creating images both full of depth and evocative to the viewer by transferring the images of his mind’s eye onto unexposed film.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble?

I’m pretty boring as a photographer. I try to capture my environment without being noticed as a part of it. As a result I tend to be as subtle as possible when I’m out there.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

Generally, I shoot in waves. Often I’ll go weeks without shooting and then burn through a dozen rolls of film in a week’s time. When I go out with the express intention to shoot I usually come home with lackluster images. It feels forced. The times when I produce work I’m most proud of tends to be while traveling. Something about new surroundings inspires me to shoot and unlocks my creativity.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose?

I’d have to pack my Rolleiflex, a light meter (see: shameless Lumu plug), a roll of 220 Portra 400, a roll of 220 HP5. Having a ceiling of 48 images for the year and a single camera to work with would be an awesome challenge. Wait…what kind of beer do they serve in that universe? Your response might change my answer.

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings?

I almost always take a meter reading upon entering my environment. Once that baseline exposure is set in my mind I usually take it on gut feeling from there when I think I’ll need more or less light.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

If you could give one final advice / task / riddle to your fellow photographers, what would it be?

Stop blaming your gear. Take a year off of buying stuff and instead invest in the books of legendary photographers and shoot. I guarantee you’ll progress further along in your journey than if you had focused on equipment.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

Your top 4 current photographers?

Johnny Patience (http://www.johnnypatience.com) - Growing up in Europe must’ve exposed him to clean lines and subtle pastel landscapes as those are ever-present in his work. Perhaps the only photographer on this list who’s work mine most attempt to resemble, Johnny sets the bar incredibly high. Truly beautiful work. 

Thomas Boyd (http://www.thomasrboyd.com) - A newspaper photographer who has worked for quite some time for the Oregonian. He has an editorial eye that he uses to capture moments in his unique style. His work transports me into the moments he captures.

Yumna Al-Arashi (http://www.yumnaaa.com) - The only thing more interesting than her backstory is her work. Her work is her. I don’t really know a better way to explain that. She grew up a Muslim in the U.S. during an era of strained relations between Islamic nations and the West posed its challenges but perhaps not as much as capturing femininity and its power as a resident of Beirut. Her eclectic history is clearly visible in the work she produces.  Like I said, her work is her.

Anastasia Petukhova (http://asildaphotography.com) - Born is Moscow, Anastasia creates work that stops me in my tracks. Working primarily in Black & White she has a style that captures her subjects in a sublime and elegant way. Whether she fills the frame with a solitary subject or hides it away amongst a sea of negative space, her style is one I highly respect.

Links or anything else you would like to share!

You’ll probably find a bunch of Lumu users through the Film Shooters Collective (https://www.filmshooterscollective.com).

Lastly I’d just like to say that you guys rock. I’m so honored to be featured here for a number of reasons. Not the least of which is the fact that you guys are such a cool company.  A while back I wrote to you guys asking for additional pouches for different camera straps. I would’ve been happy to buy them but instead you guys graciously gave them to me and I’ve been using them ever since.  Please keep the project going (although it’s hard to imagine you guys needing to improve on anything).

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

Hi, I am a terrible swimmer that just graduated from high school in Germany - and by ‘just’ I mean a little over a year ago. In my final two years of school I developed a great interest in visual arts.

Now, after one year of traveling, working in-between trips and trying to write this blog post - yeah, this thing really took me almost a year to finish - I am starting to get my feet wet as an assistant for a well established commercial photographer. Meanwhile I am preparing a portfolio for my college application, building a website and trying to establish an income with my photography. In exactly this order.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

As a small child I wanted to become a police officer. On a horse. Sergeant Nick Angel Style. That dream evolved into being a fighter pilot, a photographer, a CGI artist and I am pretty sure at some point I wanted to become a rockstar.
Now I am sticking to photography and have a long way to go if I want to become the photographer of my childhood dreams.

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?

Listen to music for inspiration, doing bike tours and trying to get a hold of things to stay motivated. All these activities are connected with photography and most of the time I end up with a camera in my hand.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

What do you want to achieve?

World Peace. But I would settle for selling prints and living off that.

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

Probably some old family photos. I can’t remember.

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)?

My mind keeps running away with me. That is my superpower and at the same time my biggest weakness. So overcoming this would be quite detrimental to my work but boost my business.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

Dedication and Inspiration. To stay dedicated you have to find some sort of motivation.
The more personal the better.
Anything you feel is inspiration. Widen your appreciation for art and focus on becoming a nicer person.

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble?

The most exhilarating, knee-shaking experience without a doubt was photographing David Guetta on stage. Fire coming out from over there, lights all over the place, almost 10000 people staring in your vicinity, with the nerve wrecking music tying all of this together. I don’t know how long I was up there, it could have been just half a minute or ten minutes. Pretty crazy.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

Well, that depends solely on my motivation. Which happens to be rather unstable. There used to be a time when I would come home from a day of shooting with at least half a 35mm roll and two 120 rolls of film fully exposed. Now it feels like one or two pictures is the most I can do.
A couple of weeks ago I went on a bike tour with a good friend where I did not shoot a single frame in 5 days. Which was quite unsettling.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose?

Depending on the universe I end up in a weapon of some sorts would be great. Especially if its population has never seen a camera before. A Mamiya RB67 should do the trick. With it a sack full of film. Add to that a stealthy digital point-and-shoot I can easily disguise so I don’t have to wield my Mamiya. Maybe an invisibility cloak for when shit hits the fan like in Rick & Morty.

Pretty expensive but imagine how much I could make with photos from a parallel universe. I am not that bad of a businessman that I would come out of it with a loss.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings?

Well, you have to rely on your instruments to deliver what you envision. One reason I shoot on film is it's simplicity. No convoluted menus, no focus by wire and so on. It just works. If the camera decides to get wonky, you just get another one or, in the case of a valuable one like a Hasselblad, have it checked. But let me tell you, those things are built like tanks. My Hasselblad had to endure many shakes and bumps on my bike tours and that fucker still kinda works.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

Your top 4 current photographers?

Martin Schöller, Robert Richardson, Anton Corbijn and Roger Deakins.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

Your final advice / riddle to your fellow photographers.

If you are not swimming you are drowning.

 

Check Lucas on Instagram for his latest photos: https://www.instagram.com/lucluclucas

 

Shortcut to Camera app, click, add filter, upload, get 5000...



Shortcut to Camera app, click, add filter, upload, get 5000 likes, I’m a photographer.

A Medium Format Shooter’s Photographic Process by photographer Andrew Jamieson (http://andycreative.co.uk/).

Featured #24: Richard Douglas Gledhill

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What did you want to become in the childhood?
When I was a child I wanted to be an artist. I remember taking home stories that I had written and drawings that I had passionately done in class. I remember the feeling of peace that came over me when I would create and I don’t think that has changed to this day.

Your story with photography. I bought my first dslr camera in college and fell in love with photography ever since. Now I shoot primarily film and that started because I was always trying to get film looks with my photos and I got really close but I still was off. One day it came to me that I should just shoot film to get my pictures to look like film stocks were used. No brainer, right?!

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What do you want to achieve?
I don’t really know what I want to achieve to be honest. I mean, I want to be famous and known worldwide for my work but I don’t know if that is at the top of my list. I guess I want to achive the ability to empower others with my gift. I think that directly correlates with what I think the the greatest power of photography is. Photographs have this power to raise emotions out of us, perhaps emotions we have not felt in a long time. If I can consistently do that as an artist I feel that would be my greatest achievement.

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for good photograph comes from? I feel that a photograph is a play between luck (being in the right place at the right time) and talent (knowing your camera, framing, lighting etc.) The best photographs  are a dance between these attributes.

Your camera bag. At all times when I shoot I have a medium format camera and a 35mm camera. I am also carrying film, lens cleaning supplies and my trusty Lumu Light meter!

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Highlight one great experience of your life.
I would say one of the greatest experiences in my life was sitting down at a coffee shop and showing my work to one of my favorite photographers (Kym Ventola) and hearing the encouraging things she had to say about my work. That definitely sparked a fire in my heart to pursue photography with full force. If that didn’t happen I don’t think I would be shooting today if it wasn’t for that conversation. 

Do you have any kind of obsession? My obsession with film is probably my most notable obsession in terms of photography. It’s romantic. I am smitten for film. The way it looks and the tone it has compared to digital photographs. There is just something about it that I can’t explain.

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If you could give one final advice to fellow photographers, what would it be? 
Never stop shooting. You get better with practice and constantly being put out of your comfort zone. Reach out to all of your favorite photographers and try to snag a mentor. Having a mentor who has way more experience than you is probably one of the best things you can do for your career. 

Links! My website is www.richarddouglas.co and my instagram handle is @iamricharddouglas

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GIF: http://goo.gl/tZbIeb “Still images can contain stories…the...





















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“Still images can contain stories…the mind and emotions can become engaged by looking at a still image and small stories can grow into huge stories. It depends, of course, on the viewer.” David Lynch

This is how we do it. Anyone else? :) #believeinfilm #shootfilm...





This is how we do it. Anyone else? :) #believeinfilm #shootfilm #refrigerator #analog #fujifilm