Lumu Blog

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner
 

My name is Steven Miner. Im photographer currently working in Grand Rapids, Michigan. I will be graduating with my BFA in photography this spring. Originally I am from metro Detroit.

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

When I was child It felt like I wanted to do something different with my life every week. I picked up lots of hobbies, got into trouble and took all my toys apart. It wasn't untilI my senior year of high school that I picked up a camera and for some reason it just stuck.

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?

I like to play music and look at things that other artists are doing.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

What do you want to achieve?

At this point I honestly don't know. I know I want to keep making pictures, producing art and having conversations about it. Like most things I think after a while it will all just make sense.

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

It was just one of those hobbies that I decided to pick up. I found my moms camera one day and starting making pictures of my self and things around my house. My senior year I took a photography class and I was sold. I moved to Chicago for school that fall to study at Columbia College where I met the people that most heavily influenced the way I think about photography today.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)?

Superpower? geez I don't know. I always tend to be very precise and exact but I wouldn’t consider that a superpower. My weakness is probably my unparalleled ability to get distracted. Its something I've had to deal with my entire life. Half of the time it gets me into trouble but the other half of the time is when something magical happens. I guess I deal with it just by trusting my self. Knowing that something good could come out of it.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

I think good photographs happen when someone is being honest behind a camera. Not trying to adapt to trends or being mimetic of all the great images that have passed us. Its something that took me a while to start achieving and I am just now starting to see results. I approach photography very intuitively. Sometimes that makes it easy and sometimes it feels like I have forgotten how to make images.

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble?

I've always had pretty good luck. I've never been arrested or told to leave and I'm thankful for that. I usually end up making a better picture knowing I'm somewhere I probably shouldn't be.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

It defiantly is always changing. Right now I probably make under a thousand images a year for personal use.

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose?

Contax T2, Mamiya 7, Some kind of light weight rail camera. And I guess something digital. Maybe a phase one.

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings?

I think I mostly rely on the feeling I have being behind a camera and then making a print. I usually know immediately if I have made anything worth while and thats defiantly a feeling.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

If you could give one final advice / task / riddle to your fellow photographers, what would it be?

Stop thinking about photographs as truth and start considering it as a medium that can convince someone something is true. Things have changed allot since I made that realization.

Featured photographer #61: Steven Miner

Your top 4 current photographers?

Jan Dibbets
John Houck
John Opera
Wolfgang Tillmans

Links or anything else you would like to share!

stevenjohnminer.com

Featured Photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Featured Photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Hi, I'm Rob and I currently reside in Dallas, TX. I work in the film industry as an editor and fell in love with still photography about 3 years ago. I shoot a mixture of film and digital for mostly street and travel, but when I do shoot film I've come to rely on my Lumu to make sure I've got the right settings locked in.

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

At one point I wanted to be an astronaut, then an archaeologist and finally a paleontologist. After seeing Jurassic Park in 1993, I decided that I had to find out how they created those dinosaurs. So at 13 years old I knew the path I wanted to take, and today I work in the film and visual effects industry. So that actually kind of worked out!

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?

When I don't have a camera in my hand, I'm working as an editor - usually editing 24 frames per second instead of just one frame.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

What do you want to achieve?

Photographically speaking, I've really started to focus on more long term projects and less on unrelated snapshots. I'm hoping to be able to pull together some of these images into a full fledged documentary project, with the ultimate goal either being a published book or some kind of exhibition. These are lofty goals as I'm still finding my own style and have a relatively young photography "career", but I think it's important to aim high when it comes to goals like these.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

Given my current career, it will probably come as no surprise that I initially got into photography gear because of its ability to produce amazing video. I initially thought I was going to produce more videos (something I've only just now gotten into with a new YouTube channel), but it was actually the still photography aspects that really grabbed hold of me.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler


In the early days of learning this new equipment, I found myself hitting the shutter button more than the "video record" button, and learning about how to properly compose and expose still images overtook videography entirely.

Film photography actually just landed on me last year! And I fell hard. I currently shoot medium format and 35mm film. I somehow missed the train in my younger years as far as film cameras go and adopted the earliest of digital cameras. It's great to be able to have this equipment now and learn about the nuances of film photography and how different it can be to shooting digital. I can also relate more to the film to digital transition in our motion picture film industry now that I've handled both systems in still photography.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)?

I think a superpower of mine, that a lot of people have noticed and commented on, is how outgoing I am when I'm out shooting. I usually won't hesitate to approach someone if I notice something that entices me to shoot, and I can count on one hand the times people have said "No". You always have to read the scene to know if you should approach someone with enthusiasm or a little more discreet so as not to embarrass them, but usually if you get past the initial introduction with a smile you can put most people at ease and come away with a nice portrait.

As far as weaknesses, like most photographers I can succumb to Gear Acquisition Syndrome, but I've done reasonably well recently in keeping that in check!

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

That's a really great question, and I think the answer is kind of hidden within it. Once you've put yourself in the right place at the right time, it really comes down to truly seeing the scene unfold around you. I think if something catches your eye, that's your instinct telling you that if you take your time and work the scene just right, a good photograph could come from it.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble?

When I lived in Montreal I attended a number of protests (some small, some large). On more than one occasion I found myself in the middle of the protesters and the riot police, and more than once I was tapped on the shoulder to step back or move out of the way. I never found myself in any truly violent situations, but let's just say things got…tense.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

You know how some people say to shoot every day? Well...heh. I don't manage that! I've been spending a lot more time "getting my photographic house in order", so to speak. Backing up digital files, organizing, labeling negatives, properly storing them and printing and framing more of my favorite work. I felt like this foundation was cracking, and lately I've taken to repairing it to make sure that projects I work on from here on out will be properly looked after instead of adding them to a big mess!

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose?

Tough question. Well if it's for an entire year I definitely want to bring a digital solution, so I'd have my Fuji X-T2 with the 18-55mm lens (sorry prime lovers, gotta stay versatile!) and plenty of memory cards and batteries. After that I think I'd bring my Mamiya 645 Pro TL with the 80mm f/2.8. And as much Portra 400 as I can fit in my bag. And of course my Lumu light meter for the film!

Wait, I've gone way over 4 pieces, haven't I? I don't tend to pack light in reality, either...

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings?

I find that this depends on which medium I'm shooting. If I'm shooting digital I rely a lot on the instruments. Electronic viewfinderrs can show us exactly what our exposure will look like, so I can tweak a lot in-camera.

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler


When I shoot film, I usually take a reading with my Lumu and then from there, as long as lighting doesn't drastically change, I feel like I'm spending more time on framing, timing and composing (feeling the scene) rather than tweaking camera settings.

If you could give one final advice / task / riddle to your fellow photographers, what would it be?

I once asked a photographer named George Zimbel for advice. His reply was "Advice is bad." Whether or not that's necessarily true, I think an important thing to take away from that is that in any creative medium you have to find your own way. So my "advice" is to take everything with a grain of salt and to not be afraid to share your own unique point of view with the world. Especially in print!

Featured photographer #60: Rob Zeigler

Your top 4 current photographers?

Top 4? Man, that's incredibly hard. OK, let me try to narrow this down to contemporary photographers who have helped shape my own view of photography and who I actively follow on Twitter. All of them also have unique styles of photography that I enjoy seeing on a daily basis:

Patrick LaRoque (@laroquephoto) - Patrick has this great ability to bring the viewer into the most intimate of moments, almost as if he has a way of finding the beauty in what others would consider mundane situations. He has a keen eye, a great sense of timing and color relationships and also an uncanny ability to work a scene. He also happens to be a wordsmith; perfectly blending his imagery with his heartfelt words.
Johnny Patience (@JohnnyPatience) - Johnny recently completed a 365 project (one photo per day for a year) that I think perfectly reflects his trained eye for composition. I also appreciate Johnny's ability to promote community in the photographic circles I follow, which I think is important in this social media day and age. He actively contributes to the film community by offering his advice and sharing his experiences, and that's a wonderful trait to have.
Joe Greer (@ioegreer) - I only just started following Joe but some of his candid documentary-style shots from the recent US inauguration and subsequent marches really struck a chord with me. His other landscape, travel and lifestyle images from the Pacific Northwest are also stunning.
Andre Wagner (@photoDre) - Andre's style is classic and timeless. His street photography in and around the boroughs of NYC is destined to be looked back on fondly in books and exhibitions. It isn't every day when I can look at a contemporary photographers work and know that it's going to be timeless, you know? It's like I can already hear people when they look back on Andre's work and study his methods and his style. It's great to be able to follow along with him now.

Links or anything else you would like to share!

I just want to say that it's great to be featured on the blog and I'm glad to have my Lumu light meter with me wherever I go!
If anyone reading this wants to get in touch, here's a few ways to interact with me:

Website: www.robzeiglerphoto.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/RobZeigler
Instagram: www.instagram.com/robzeigler

And also, I've finally launched a brand new YouTube channel where I'm going to be sharing reviews and other insights into photography:

www.youtube.com/channel/UCzBC2lX5IPd_iHL2oulR8ag

Thanks again, Lumu!

Featured photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

Featured photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

Hello! My name is Stephan and I live and work with my family in Switzerland. I'm doing pastoral work in a parish and a prison. Photography is a passion which accompanies me since many years and is part of my everyday life.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

In my childhood I wanted to be an explorer of unknown territories. Reading books about ancient times, studying maps of the world...
Well, working with people, especially with inmates in a prison can lead one definitely unto unknown ground…

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?

I love to write and journal a lot, sometimes I do watercolors and love to spend time in the woods. Drawing and describing a location is a different thing than taking pictures, but leads also to an intimate knowledge of a spot. Also reading novels and especially poetry brings me to an new view of the world and the people around me.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

What do you want to achieve?

More and more I try to make pictures which are telling little stories or are evoking personal feelings. I try to reduce scenes and find the one single spot where this can happen.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

I still remember my father with his Zeiss Contaflex and some macro lenses. He loved it to do close-ups of flowers and took also a lot of pictues. My first real camera was a Minolta x500. I always was a visual guy, loving colors and light in different shades. Later I worked with 35mm, medium format and large format and started to look more and more to photobooks to learn more about the art.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)?

Hm. I think I can very well accomodate to different locations, situations and get easily in contact with people. I cannot deny a little gear acquisition syndrom, but Imworking on it…

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

I think it comes out of curiosity and an open mindset. Beeing sensitive for situations, the light and colors, structures and so on.

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble?

Maybe it was not that appropriate to take pictures with a flash in a completely dark hut of a nomad tribe in Ethiopia while a coffeeceremony...

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

Almost daily, I think. To start the day will a little still life on my desk became almost a ritual in the morning. I try to keep an camera with me as often as possible, there are so many interesting situations around, even in the familiar surroundings.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose?

My Leica MP with rolls of film, a fine notebook and fountain pen, a small but powerful lightmeter (any suggestions?), and my old African enamel mug for coffee.

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings?

My main focus is on feelings and telling little stories, so I rely more on my feelings than on an instrument. For still lives I try to arrange the items in an eyepleasing, somehow open and natural way. But I need a tool that fits my needs. But I do not like when technic gets between me and my photograph.

If you could give one final advice / task / riddle to your fellow photographers, what would it be?

I'm better off taking advice than giving...

Featured Photographer #59: Stephan Brunner

Your top 4 current photographers?

Sam Abell - His patience and compositions are amazing.
David Allen Harvey - vivid an colorful.
Raymond Depardon - into the great wide open...
Lorenzo Castatore - his "Paradiso" is a completly different view on life.
Let me mention also Eugene Smith for his dedication to the art and craft.

Thank you to the LUMU Team for giving me the opportunity to share my thoughts and photographs and for your versatile little lightmeter. And thank you, dear reader, for reading this. If you are interested in my pictures, take a look at my Instagram @stephanmbrunner

Featured photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

Featured photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

My name is Omid Kianersi and I live in a Los Angeles suburb. I’m trying my best to get better at photography. I’ve already landed my dream job (okay second dream job after astronaut rockstar) so I get to keep this my passion and creative outlet. I’m pretty proud of the fact that I’ve had a beer on every continent except Antarctica.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

I grew up a curious child in what seemed like a bigger world than what exists today. I wanted to know everything and explore everywhere. As I grew up I intentionally went to a university far from my home and as an adult I’ve made it my goal to travel the world. The curiosity and wonder that child once had still exists in the adult I’ve become only now I have the means and drive to explore them.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?

When I don’t have a camera I’m constantly thinking about light. I’m evaluating the light around me and what techniques I would use to capture what I’m seeing. Like an athlete who repetitively works on a skill so that on game day it comes naturally. I don’t want my camera to limit my ability to capture the decisive moment when it arises.

What do you want to achieve?

My goals is to create work that is meaningful to others. The highest validation I receive is when my work finds its way onto someone’s wall. Whether it be in a gallery or in someone’s bedroom, another person had to find value in my work. From time to time all photographers yearn for mass recognition and adoration. I’m no exception. Yet I always come back to a fundamental desire to create work worthy of display.

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

From the first time I placed an exposed sheet of photo paper into a developer tray in my high school photography class I was hooked. As I agitated the tray an image emerged from a previously white canvas. It was magic.

It still is magic. We all have unique perspectives born from different experiences. I love that photography provides a means for someone to literally see the world as you do even if it is only one image at a time.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)?

I’m not very good at candid street photography and I’m terrible at approaching strangers to take their portraits. That’s probably the reason so much of my work features landscapes or uses people in accessory roles and not as the focal point. My only superpower is a hyper vigilance. Its a benefit to my photography to be aware of my surroundings all the time but it can be a curse in day to day life that I can’t ignore some of the annoying things people around me are doing. It probably explains the early onset curmudgeon-ness I deal with sometimes.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

An often forgotten fact is that the camera is a tool. Photographers sometimes fetishize their gear and I don’t understand that. I love my cameras, my Lumu, my gear. But they are merely a means to producing a print. A photographer should master their equipment and turn their attention to recognizing moment, developing a style, and creating images both full of depth and evocative to the viewer by transferring the images of his mind’s eye onto unexposed film.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble?

I’m pretty boring as a photographer. I try to capture my environment without being noticed as a part of it. As a result I tend to be as subtle as possible when I’m out there.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

Generally, I shoot in waves. Often I’ll go weeks without shooting and then burn through a dozen rolls of film in a week’s time. When I go out with the express intention to shoot I usually come home with lackluster images. It feels forced. The times when I produce work I’m most proud of tends to be while traveling. Something about new surroundings inspires me to shoot and unlocks my creativity.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose?

I’d have to pack my Rolleiflex, a light meter (see: shameless Lumu plug), a roll of 220 Portra 400, a roll of 220 HP5. Having a ceiling of 48 images for the year and a single camera to work with would be an awesome challenge. Wait…what kind of beer do they serve in that universe? Your response might change my answer.

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings?

I almost always take a meter reading upon entering my environment. Once that baseline exposure is set in my mind I usually take it on gut feeling from there when I think I’ll need more or less light.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

If you could give one final advice / task / riddle to your fellow photographers, what would it be?

Stop blaming your gear. Take a year off of buying stuff and instead invest in the books of legendary photographers and shoot. I guarantee you’ll progress further along in your journey than if you had focused on equipment.

Featured Photographer #58: Omid Kianersi

Your top 4 current photographers?

Johnny Patience (http://www.johnnypatience.com) - Growing up in Europe must’ve exposed him to clean lines and subtle pastel landscapes as those are ever-present in his work. Perhaps the only photographer on this list who’s work mine most attempt to resemble, Johnny sets the bar incredibly high. Truly beautiful work. 

Thomas Boyd (http://www.thomasrboyd.com) - A newspaper photographer who has worked for quite some time for the Oregonian. He has an editorial eye that he uses to capture moments in his unique style. His work transports me into the moments he captures.

Yumna Al-Arashi (http://www.yumnaaa.com) - The only thing more interesting than her backstory is her work. Her work is her. I don’t really know a better way to explain that. She grew up a Muslim in the U.S. during an era of strained relations between Islamic nations and the West posed its challenges but perhaps not as much as capturing femininity and its power as a resident of Beirut. Her eclectic history is clearly visible in the work she produces.  Like I said, her work is her.

Anastasia Petukhova (http://asildaphotography.com) - Born is Moscow, Anastasia creates work that stops me in my tracks. Working primarily in Black & White she has a style that captures her subjects in a sublime and elegant way. Whether she fills the frame with a solitary subject or hides it away amongst a sea of negative space, her style is one I highly respect.

Links or anything else you would like to share!

You’ll probably find a bunch of Lumu users through the Film Shooters Collective (https://www.filmshooterscollective.com).

Lastly I’d just like to say that you guys rock. I’m so honored to be featured here for a number of reasons. Not the least of which is the fact that you guys are such a cool company.  A while back I wrote to you guys asking for additional pouches for different camera straps. I would’ve been happy to buy them but instead you guys graciously gave them to me and I’ve been using them ever since.  Please keep the project going (although it’s hard to imagine you guys needing to improve on anything).

Featured Photographer #57: Jorge Nieto

Featured Photographer #57: Jorge Nieto

Hi, my name is Jorge, I am from Madrid and I am a soon to be 40 year old big kid. I’ve been working in audiovisuals for a while, sometimes it feels It’s been for way toooo long. I am a 3d animator who loves to play with lights at the studio and works as a camera operator. Weird profile, I know, but somebody has to do the job! I always say that I will end my days living in an island, shooting pictures and just sitting in the sand watching the world go by. A cold beer in this scenario would be nice too.

Featured Photographer #57: Jorge Nieto

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

Man, if I had become everything I wanted to be when I was a child, probably I would be suffering of some kind of multiple personality disorder these days. A vet, an ice cream seller, a rockstar... now I can understand my mother's worried face.

Featured Photographer #57: Jorge Nieto

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

Well, I guess I should blame this on my father. He used to be a photographer and he taught me well.

As a kid, I've been always surrounded by all kinds of film rolls and emulsions. I remember playing with a Kodak Brownie Fiesta at my grandparents place... those were the days. Just imagine my dad's eyes, raised into old school photography when his boy brought home his first digital camera. Priceless, believe me.

Featured Photographer #57: Jorge Nieto

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

What is a good photograph after all? Whose eyes judges it? Which are the rules? What feelings are involved in the shot? Is a picture made with a pinhole camera less valuable than the one shot with a Leica glass or a high end 1DX? In my opinion, we care too much about manuals and how to's. Maybe that forgotten shot made with a disposable camera becomes your favourite years later. You never know. Find that connection. Keep shooting. Fail. Retry. Learn.

Featured Photographer #57: Jorge Nieto

This is my bag. There are many like it but this one is mine.

I've been shooting with Canon DSLRs for many, many years until that pain on my back told me to stop. I remember flying to Japan a few years ago and packing five lenses, two bodies and a little Fuji X-E1 that turned out to be a game changer in the way I used to see photography. Since then, I started to pay attention to the mirrorless market until today. I changed my huge Lowepro full of heavy glass, Canon bodies, flashes and expensive gadgets from the outer space for a little Domke bag filled with a Fuji X100T, an Xpro2, a couple of prime lenses and the little kickass Lumu (goodbye $600 Sekonic!) ..damn guys!, where have you been all my life!? Can you see me smiling? 

Depending on the mood, I like switching from the Fuji equipment to a 35mm film Pentax ME Super and a little Yashica rangefinder, but light gear as well.

I like shooting both digital and film. I really enjoy using film for my personal projects but I don't think one is better over the other. For me, both are fun to use at the right time. Long story short, when it comes to takes pictures, embracing simplicity does the job for me.

Featured Photographer #57: Jorge Nieto

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

I always have a camera with me. Every single day that I leave my home, there is at least one camera in my bag. Do I shoot everyday? I try to. I like challenging myself setting up different tasks related to photography, matter of fact, a few weeks ago, this book ended in my hands,The Photographer's Playbook. It's fun to read because it crosses the line about how to's, tips and tricks and comes up with really practical ideas and other times with really deep considerations that goes beyond the shutter sound and the prints in your hand.

Featured Photographer #57: Jorge Nieto

If you could give one final advice / task / riddle to your fellow photographers, what would it be?

Fall in love with what you do and enjoy the ride.

Find more on Jorge's work at:

www.donutholeuniverse.com

or follow him on Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/donut_hole_universe/


Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

Hi, I am a terrible swimmer that just graduated from high school in Germany - and by ‘just’ I mean a little over a year ago. In my final two years of school I developed a great interest in visual arts.

Now, after one year of traveling, working in-between trips and trying to write this blog post - yeah, this thing really took me almost a year to finish - I am starting to get my feet wet as an assistant for a well established commercial photographer. Meanwhile I am preparing a portfolio for my college application, building a website and trying to establish an income with my photography. In exactly this order.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today?

As a small child I wanted to become a police officer. On a horse. Sergeant Nick Angel Style. That dream evolved into being a fighter pilot, a photographer, a CGI artist and I am pretty sure at some point I wanted to become a rockstar.
Now I am sticking to photography and have a long way to go if I want to become the photographer of my childhood dreams.

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand?

Listen to music for inspiration, doing bike tours and trying to get a hold of things to stay motivated. All these activities are connected with photography and most of the time I end up with a camera in my hand.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

What do you want to achieve?

World Peace. But I would settle for selling prints and living off that.

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you?

Probably some old family photos. I can’t remember.

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)?

My mind keeps running away with me. That is my superpower and at the same time my biggest weakness. So overcoming this would be quite detrimental to my work but boost my business.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?

Dedication and Inspiration. To stay dedicated you have to find some sort of motivation.
The more personal the better.
Anything you feel is inspiration. Widen your appreciation for art and focus on becoming a nicer person.

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble?

The most exhilarating, knee-shaking experience without a doubt was photographing David Guetta on stage. Fire coming out from over there, lights all over the place, almost 10000 people staring in your vicinity, with the nerve wrecking music tying all of this together. I don’t know how long I was up there, it could have been just half a minute or ten minutes. Pretty crazy.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

How often do you / don’t you shoot?

Well, that depends solely on my motivation. Which happens to be rather unstable. There used to be a time when I would come home from a day of shooting with at least half a 35mm roll and two 120 rolls of film fully exposed. Now it feels like one or two pictures is the most I can do.
A couple of weeks ago I went on a bike tour with a good friend where I did not shoot a single frame in 5 days. Which was quite unsettling.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose?

Depending on the universe I end up in a weapon of some sorts would be great. Especially if its population has never seen a camera before. A Mamiya RB67 should do the trick. With it a sack full of film. Add to that a stealthy digital point-and-shoot I can easily disguise so I don’t have to wield my Mamiya. Maybe an invisibility cloak for when shit hits the fan like in Rick & Morty.

Pretty expensive but imagine how much I could make with photos from a parallel universe. I am not that bad of a businessman that I would come out of it with a loss.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings?

Well, you have to rely on your instruments to deliver what you envision. One reason I shoot on film is it's simplicity. No convoluted menus, no focus by wire and so on. It just works. If the camera decides to get wonky, you just get another one or, in the case of a valuable one like a Hasselblad, have it checked. But let me tell you, those things are built like tanks. My Hasselblad had to endure many shakes and bumps on my bike tours and that fucker still kinda works.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

Your top 4 current photographers?

Martin Schöller, Robert Richardson, Anton Corbijn and Roger Deakins.

Featured Photographer #56: Lucas Weber

Your final advice / riddle to your fellow photographers.

If you are not swimming you are drowning.

 

Check Lucas on Instagram for his latest photos: https://www.instagram.com/lucluclucas

 

FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER #55: Mark Ivkovic

FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER #55: Mark Ivkovic

Featured Photographer #55: Mark Ivkovic

 

Hi, my name is Mark Ivkovic and I’m a photographer currently based in London, England. My professional work is primarily that of portraiture based around personal style, lifestyle and stories. I used to wear the label of fashion photographer but to be honest fashion photography very rarely interests me, I find the idea of only wearing what someone else decides is “in” a little offensive. Somewhere along the line I realised that what I do care about and what I do wish to express in my work is the style of the people I work with and what stories that tells. This is what drives me to create the portrait work I do, finding truth in the people I photograph, everyone has something to teach us if we give them space and time to reveal it.

 

Featured Photographer #55: Mark Ivkovic

 

I’d always wanted to work for Walt Disney as an animator as a kid. I lived for cartoons as a young child and I guess that love became my dream. That didn’t really pan out for a number of reasons. This being before the internet and easy access to animation software, Oh yeah and the fact I lived in a small Yorkshire village a million miles away from LA. I came to photography a little later in life via a desire to document what I did. A very naive journal of random snapshots. It slowly dawned on me that I’d begun using a camera to express what I had previously in drawing. So although I didn’t get to create epic tales with Walt, I still get to tell my stories in a visual way.

When I don’t have a camera in my hand, I guess the easy answer would be it’s still within arms reach. As a less flippant answer I run, dabble in the kitchen a little, I still draw, I spend time educating myself and often just go and get lost in the forest behind my house along with my pet Whippet.

 

Featured Photographer #55: Mark Ivkovic

Your personal story with photography in 12 words

Existing by doing what I love, trying to make a meaningful work.

Featured Photographer #55: Mark Ivkovic

 

That leads on to what I want to achieve, simple really I just have a desire to create work that means something to me. Both personally and professionally. Therein lies one of my biggest obstacles, the dichotomy of my professional client work and my more personal projects. It’s something I’ve struggled with over the years and in the end I realised I just have to suck it up and let the paycheque be the inspiration sometimes. Those are the jobs that allow me the freedom to then go out and create work that I feel has something to say. My superpower? the ability to eat breakfast at anytime of the day, If I need to be awake at 4am to get to a job then I’m on the porridge and out the door. Trust me as a working photographer this is an essential skill. My biggest weakness? I guess self-doubt. You know, the fear, the self loathing, the gremlins that whisper to you at 2am in the morning. It can be a very lonely place making a living as a photographer so you need to make sure those conversations you have with yourself don’t destroy your confidence. I’ve spoken to a number of creatives with similar feelings on this, outwardly we put on our “pro” faces but inside we’re kind of a mess. Within that though I think resides the sign that the work you’re creating is valid, if a part of you is saying it sucks then that’s potentially because it means something to you personally and the fear is that no-one else will “like” it.

 

Featured Photographer #55: Mark Ivkovic

You ask the craziest thing I ever did as a photographer?

I don’t know, I’ve probably had a good number of “dicey” situations but I’m still here with all my biological pieces still attached and working so everything worked out. My lust for cameras has had me in trouble once though, lesson learnt the hard way on that one.

Where is the barrier between photographer and subject?

This is a really interesting and broad question, something I could happily lose an evening and a bottle of wine debating. I feel many people imagine that when they work with a subject, especially in portrait work, that they somehow make the camera invisible. Yes that is the dream we have but essentially the camera is always going to be the elephant in the room. We all know it’s there and that it is going to be used to document what is in front of it. The camera is the barrier and it’s our job to lessen the effect that it has through our skills and experience. Can work be made that reflects what may have been had the camera not been there? That’s a little like “If a tree falls in a forest and no one is there to hear it does it still make a noise?”.

The bag;

My bag might come as a little surprise for those who may have known my work for a while. The little German red dot wearing cameras have all gone. Yup all of them. Without getting into details the M240 I had just killed my love for the M system. I’ll always have a special place in my heart for the Leica as I’ve shot some great work with them over the years but that chapter is over for now. I’ve always struggled with my own analogue / digital dilemma. I adore film, I learnt on film and I appreciate the difference it brings to me personally. However I also live in the real world and work with digital because quite frankly it’d be impossible not to. Clients demand instant feedback and rapid turn around. Plus the 100% knowledge that on a mission critical job the images are good and in the bag makes everyones life easier. That is where the Hasselblad comes in. I have a deep love of design and in particular of Functionalist design. Things that are designed to do what they need to do, in a simple and elegant way. Many (if not most ) of my possessions are decided upon via this kind of philosophy. My love of the Lumu in part comes from this philosophy also, simple, elegant and functional design. The 503CWD satisfies both my analogue and my digital brains while still employing the same picture taking process. It is the perfect tool for me at this moment in my career and allows me the freedom to practically “build” the camera into what I need it to do for each job. Fast paced client studio shoot? Throw on the digital back a 45 degree prism finder and power winder and I have a medium format digital beast. Personal work while travelling? film back and waist level finder (as shown) gives me a fairly compact and light weight kit to throw in my bag. Also in the bag, notebooks, business cards, lens cloth with an image on that I produced for a commercial client. Colorchecker / Grey card (which I’m hoping to dump once the new colour temp Lumu Power lands in my lap). Also my dirty little secret of a Fuji X100 original Black, plus the killer B&W compact Ricoh along with other little essentials.

 

Featured Photographer #55: Mark Ivkovic

 

The tools in my bag are often very considered choices, I’ve used practically every type of camera, I’ve worked with most major systems and experienced the best they offer. In the end it comes down to what works for the individual, personal style isn’t created through the tool you use, it’s what enables you to do your work to your best. The camera is the amplifier to you photographic voice not the script. The tools I choose are ones which make me work for the image, they give nothing for free and that harks back to my distrust of anything which is easy. I trust my kit to do what I expect it to do, if the focus is off, the exposure is wrong etc. I’m much happier it being 100% my fault than the camera screwing it up. That way I can really allow myself the freedom to create without worrying about the kit, I rely on it to do as I ask rather than to make decisions itself.

My kit for a parallel universe?

A parallel universe where I only create work for myself? The Hasselblad with a huge stock of film, notebook, comfortable shoes & an open mind. Most anything else I can live without (at least for a year), well my aeropress might have to get smuggled into the bag too.

 

Featured Photographer #55: Mark Ivkovic

Advice to fellow photographers?

Quit trying to win a yoga. Make your photos, those are the only ones that really matter. Learn light, print your work and don’t drink the camera industry Kool-aid. Ego is the enemy.

Adams, Leibowitz, Soth or Parr?

Hmmm, so I appreciate all of their work. Martin Parr I actually worked a job in Oxford while he was also working, lovely guy but to be honest I don’t “enjoy” his work. I appreciate the message and the idea but it isn’t something I seek out. Adams is like a Grandfather to all photographers but again landscapes aren’t really my thing, I do own a heavy hardbound Adams collection but it’s a little dusty. I appreciate the work of Don McCullen but his personal work actually frightens me, it has a darkness to it which reflects the vileness of the world which he has witnessed and the fact it still shows in his work is a sign that he is very much tormented by it. I’m a long time lover of the work of Anton Corbijn and Anders Petersen. Such feeling and love, such connection and honesty. Beautiful in a way but perhaps not art for the wall. Often it’s the photographer as a person that interests me not so much the individual works. The message they are trying to convey, the struggles they have endured. After visiting the Helmut Newton archive in Berlin I was an emotional wreck for three days. and don’t get me started on Tim Hetherington.

But you’re only allowing me four names for right now, so here goes;

Roversi for his beautiful understanding of emotion, Muirhead for his personal honesty and heartfelt desire to understand himself through his work. J.R. for staying true to his roots while trying to change the world with photography and lastly Platon for being one of the few to somehow follow the beat of his own drum whilst creating honest work that crosses the boundaries of the commercial world.

 

Featured Photographer #55: Mark Ivkovic

 

I’ll add a few words about the work I’ve shared with this piece, it encompasses the dichotomy I talk of. Some is assignment work, some commissioned campaigns, some portfolio work and then some which are part of personal projects. I’m happy to see similarities in them which somehow hints at what I’m attempting to say with my work in whatever context that work will be shown.

 Thank you Lumu for the chance to say a few words, anyone interested in my work can find me at my portfolio - www.bangphoto.co.uk or on Instagram - @bangphoto

Now go make pictures and share them wth the world. Show us your voice and tell your story.

Featured Photographer #54: Eli Just

My name is Eli Just. I’m 24 and work as a gaffer for film and TV in Los Angeles. Photography as a hobby grew for me out of a desire to become a better filmmaker, but quickly took on its own role. While my job as a gaffer mostly consists of setting lights in the right place to make the image look good, photography has me searching for the light that is already there.

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I enjoy the challenge of shooting on the street and the variety of reactions I encounter, along with the patience required to capture a singular perfect moment.  

Your personal story with photography in 12 words. 
I can do it in 2. Keep shooting. 

Featured Photographer #54: Eli Just

What do you want to achieve? 
I shoot as a way of relaxing, so I tend to pick up my camera and then look for a subject, rather than the other way around. A lot of my photographs come from when I am travelling, as most of the photos I take in LA are on set and are covered by some sort of NDA. The black and white series was done while I was living and studying in Prague in 2014. Since then I have mostly been focusing on shooting portraits. 

Featured Photographer #54: Eli Just


Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for a good photograph comes from?
 
A good photo comes from being in the right place, and having the foresight to see what is about to happen right before it does. If you’re lifting your camera to your eye right when you see it, you already missed it.

Featured Photographer #54: Eli Just


In your opinion, where is the social barrier between the photographer and the subject?
 
I think that as a photographer you have a lot of power, so you have to be careful with it. At the same time, if you want to take a photograph that has any meaning you need to push through that barrier. Whether you work with your subject or not is up to the individual photographer and the desired image but I think the most interesting photos break that barrier whether it be gently or with force. I have certainly gotten myself into trouble shooting on the street, but it is a freeing experience to see how much power your camera can have.

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What’s in your camera bag?
 
I started off shooting Minolta manual systems, of which I still have a half dozen. However when travelling, developing film became difficult and scanning and editing even harder, so I switched bodies to a Sony A7, while keeping the manual Minolta glass. I instantly fell in love with the camera and it has almost entirely replaced my film bodies. For the most part I only ever shoot with a Minolta MC 58mm f/1.4 via an ND throttle adapter, alongside a Minolta MD 24mm f/2.8 which has it’s own adapter due to the stop. While I have a Sekonic 758 that I use on set, I don’t tend use it when shooting stills as it’s yet another expensive item to bring and I tend to want to be very lightweight when I shoot. I’m looking forward to the Lumu Power for a small meter that I can use both on the street and on set.

Featured Photographer #54: Eli Just


Favorite photographers?
 
My biggest inspirations are Henri Cartier-Bresson and Marc Riboud.

From Photokina with Lumulove

If you are planning your late summer holidays somewhere around Cologne, Germany, make sure you stop by to the Koelnmesse trade fair from the 20th - 25th of September.

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We are presenting our most anticipated Lumu Power prototype to the public for the very first time ever on Photokina trade fair. If you are planning to be around don’t hesitate to stop by and check it out in person. We’re situated in hall 4.1, stand C-015 and will for this affair only move our whole office & operations there for the time being, so no time goes to waste.


Lumulabs (Hall 4.1, C-015) Photokina 2016 location

This way we’ll demonstrate our most powerful light meter in action at the biggest trade fair in the world while at the same time working our asses off to keep our development processes intact.

Let me know if you have any more questions or if you wish to schedule a meeting — we’re looking forward to it!

Email us at pr@lu.mu

Power on Lumunauts!

Featured Photographer #53: Michael Lord

Hello! My name is Michael Lord and I’m an IT professional living in Santa Fe, New Mexico.


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Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you? The first camera I purchased was a Nikon D70S. What I find funny about this purchase today is that the entire time I owned the D70S, it was never used as anything more than a point-and-shoot camera. I (mis)used the D70S for 2 years, and when the iPhone was released in 2007, I completely dropped it. Fast-forward to late 2011 and that’s when I truly feel my love affair with photography began. I was doing a lot of work related travel around the state and started visiting parts of New Mexico that I’d never seen before. I began taking notice of even the smallest of details in the towns I visited, or the landscapes that played on car windows as I drove down the interstate. Basically, I saw the world in a different light and felt the need to document it. I invested in a Leica X1 and a hobby was born.


Featured Photographer #53: Michael Lord

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand? I try to spend as much time as possible outdoors, so when I’m not stuck behind a desk, you can usually catch me fishing the local lakes and rivers or hiking in the nearby mountains. A piece of my heart also belongs to the game of basketball, so I try to get some playing time in as often as possible.


Featured Photographer #53: Michael Lord

Your personal story with photography in 12 words. Married digital. Had an affair with film. Ended up in an open relationship with both.

What are your superpowers and weakness (and how do you overcome them)? My biggest weakness at this particular moment is gear acquisition syndrome. I purchased my first film body last summer, a Leica M3, and quickly became fascinated with everything film. This fascination has resulted in a somewhat unhappy bank account over the past year. On a personal level, I don’t always feel that what I’ve shot matches the expectations I’ve set for myself inside of my head. Therefore, I tend to be overly critical of my work. This becomes even more prevalent when shooting for other people. It’s fair to say that I haven’t located a silver bullet for either issue, but I am working on it.


Featured Photographer #53: Michael Lord

What attracts you to the work you shoot? At this moment in time, I’m not focused on any particular genre of photography. What I look for is that magical angle or a beautiful moment in time that I can freeze and live in for eternity. I look for everyday items that we as people tend to overlook in our busy lives and try to capture them in a different and slightly more interesting way.


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What’s in your camera bag? I have a harder time packing my camera bag than I do packing clothes for travel. Currently, I have two digital bodies that I rotate in conjunction with one of seven film bodies. The mainstays of my kit include the Lumu light meter, ExpoDisc 2.0, Joby GripTight GorillaPod, Apple lightning to SD card reader, an LED light pen, and a disposable camera. Along with the items listed above, my most recent setup included the Leica ME, Leica M3, Leica Summicron-M 50mm, and Leica Summaron 35mm.


Featured Photographer #53: Michael Lord

If you could carry only 4 pieces of equipment to a parallel universe (no photo equipment on the other side) for a year, what would you choose? This is a tough one! I would probably take my Sony A7II, two disposable cameras, and my iPhone. As much as I love film, 144 frames would be a tough sell in an alternate reality where just about everything you’ve grown up knowing as truth could suddenly be flipped upside down.


Featured Photographer #53: Michael Lord

Pearls of wisdom for fellow photographers to be? We live in an Instagram world where some would say success is measured in “Likes” and “Follows”. I say shoot for yourself and be true to yourself. Don’t get caught up in the matrix of useless numbers that live under your bio.


Featured Photographer #53: Michael Lord

Links or anything else you would like to share!

  • Instagram @michaeldlord — LINK.
  • Instagram @lordmd — LINK.

Great results can thus be achieved with small forces.

These Kickstarter updates are getting ever so easier to write down the more our whole Lumu Power development processes move forward. It’s only logical, the more it gets done the more we have to show you.

We talked about installing that 24/7 camera in our previous update but instead I would like to kindly invite you to follow our Instagram account (LINK) for more frequent, short & sweet updates. Since they implemented their own version of snaps in it, why not use it for our benefit?

OK, onto the details!

Electronics & Hardware assembly

The electronics circuit board design is now done. They are now being printed and we expect them in our offices next week, together with other hardware pieces which will be assembled into our first pilot prototype series. The final design of this series won’t be the one that’s going to be used for final production but it will be very close to that. The basic premise of this series is to test it extensively, to see how all parts fit together and to see if there are any errors either in our design or in the production line. Elemental production hygiene, so to speak.

What parts are to be assembled, you ask? Let’s take a look!



Lumu Power update #11

Electronic circuit board — the flat diffuser side with the collimator on top of the True Color sensor.

Lumu Power update #11

Electronic circuit board — the dome diffuser side with Hamamatsu photodiode in the center.

Lumu Power update #11

20x20 cm plate of 100 collimators. Only one is used per unit, on top of the True Color sensor.

Lumu Power update #11

The final version of collimators are expected next week, they will be slightly thinner and laser drilled.



Lumu Power update #11

The Lightning connectors will be ordered in bulk once we have the final version of our product plan ready. That is expected to be done once we finish with the prototype testing.



Lumu Power update #11

The cable which will connect the Lightning connector with the circuit board is basically done but we will make some slight adjustments so it can be easier soldered together.



Lumu Power update #11

The shield (of the Lightning connector) is done. If you look carefully you’ll notice it’s going to be laser welded on one side only (thug life certified).



Lumu Power update #11

The sleeve is done, the prototypes are expected to be SLA (Stereolithography) printed and delivered next week.



Lumu Power update #11

All three pieces assembled together, without the sleeve.



Lumu Power update #11

The metal ring case is done. Displayed here without the engraving.



Lumu Power update #11Lumu Power update #11

The flat diffuser and the dome are done. Also awaiting the SLA prints next week.



Lumu Power update #11

Exploded view of all parts mentioned. The assembly should be easy but the end product as solid as possible.



Lumu Power update #11

So the sleeve covers the shield once everything is put together. Then it will undergo the “BREAK OR BEND” test. FYI: it needs to snap off when certain pressure is applied.



Lumu Power update #11

Another angle.



Lumu Power update #11

And another one.



Lumu Power update #11

The same goes for the packaging — SLA prints come next week.



Lumu Power update #11

Looks pretty cool, isn’t it? :)

iOS app

The beta app is out and your first impressions are duly noted. We will take a thoughtful look at your feedback once the pilot series is done with testing.

Remember — there is no bad feedback so please “bombard” us with your thoughts, compliments, critique, suggestions, pizza … we’ll take whatever you throw at us! :)

If there’s anybody else with a Lumu light meter out there that still hasn’t tried our brand new app I sincerely hope this comment below will steer you to change your mind.

“I downloaded the new version and after the first look & fast test the design in switching between single measure and multimeasure in one feature of the app is really good!”

(Claus Watzdorf)

Conclusion

Today is World Photo Day, marking the invention of photography. Here’s to the images that give us new perspective on the world, bringing us closer together.



Lumu with the Olympic rings in Rio de Janeiro

A postcard from Rio from Nicholas Dale, NBC’s professional gaffer. A reminder from us, the Lumu community, to celebrate the 177 years of Photography.


As always, let us know below in the comments what are your thoughts about whatever … we’ll gladly answer to all of your questions.

Power on Lumunauts!

Featured Photographer #52: Renato Ribeiro

Hello, my name is Renato Ribeiro, I’m a Portuguese photographer based in Porto but working worldwide.

Featured Photographer #52: Renato Ribeiro

I’m passionate about life and people. For me photography is art and I bet on a new approach: simple and with love. More than faces and expressions I want to shoot feelings and emotions!

What did you want to become in your childhood and are you that person today? Well, I’m fortunate with the childhood I had. I was a very happy child with a good family support and like all children I was a dreamer. Most of the projects I dream about … I have managed to achieve them, but there are still plenty to do. However, the most important was to become a happy, a good person. I think I achieved that! And is that not the most important thing?

Featured Photographer #52: Renato Ribeiro

Where did you meet photography or where did photography meet you? I’ve always been an art lover! Especially photography. I have always had the need to draw, paint … well, express myself artistically. Photography has always been a passion that accompanied me throughout life, I can not identify an exact moment for our meeting. She was always there!

Featured Photographer #52: Renato Ribeiro

Nevertheless, I just start to dedicate my life more seriously to photography for about five years now when many photographer friends started almost “forcing” me to show my work. Social networks played a central role in this.

What do you do when you don’t have a camera in your hand? Oh I start to get really nervous! Hahaha…

Usually I always carry one small camera with me. It’s really hard to live without it! Besides … it’s an addiction.

Your personal story with photography in 12 words. Photography — it’s love! It’s my life. Does that say it all right?

Featured Photographer #52: Renato Ribeiro

What do you want to achieve? Don’t really know yet. For now, if I can conquer people’s hearts in some way or another it’s more then perfect.

It’s hard to talk about me and about my work like that. There are other people who should make that judgment but I would say that one of my “superpowers” is the great love I have for photography and the honesty that I have with my work. I always worry to create a good and close relationship with everyone I shoot and I try to capture their essence. Above all I want to shoot feelings and emotions and not just faces and expressions.


Featured Photographer #52: Renato Ribeiro

Weaknesses I have a lot! Hahah… Every day I try to improve my photography because I really think you never know nothing! You can always do better.

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer? Have you ever got yourself in trouble? Crazy things? Many! Hahah … and yes, I’ve got myself in some trouble. 

Featured Photographer #52: Renato Ribeiro

During a phase I explored some quite old and abandoned buildings to shoot. There can and do happen a lot of “little” troubles. Also I have had some jealous boyfriends who did not like very much to see the result of photos of their girlfriends! But I always invite everyone I photograph to bring to the session whoever they want. I do not hide my work from anyone and so it does not bother me anything. I keep it very cool like that.

Featured Photographer #52: Renato Ribeiro

In your opinion, where is the social barrier between the photographer and the subject? That depends. Usually I think that you should not shoot or at least show anything that could seriously harm the person in the picture. There must be limits and I think personal life and especially human dignity must always be preserved. We are all humans!

What annoys you the most in this profession? Oh … bad people! But unfortunately they are in all professions. I also confess that annoys me a bit when some people ask us to work for free. When I go to buy some bread I do not ask to bring them for free!

Featured Photographer #52: Renato Ribeiro

What’s in your camera bag? Well, it constantly changes as the work I have to do… but usually in my bag never miss: a

Full-frame camera (normally 5D ii or iii), a 50mm 1.4 lenses and a Fujifilm XT10 just in case!

When do you rely on your instruments and when on your feelings? Always in my feelings. Always.


Featured Photographer #52: Renato Ribeiro

Pearls of wisdom for fellow photographers to be? Just be yourself and work with love.

Ansel Adams or Annie Lebowitz or Martin Parr or Alec Soth? Very difficult choice! Uhh… maybe Ansel Adams. Hahah… can stay here all day! But I will say Henri Cartier Bresson because like that I can say all the masters!

Links or anything else you would like to share!